Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Studying Adhesion Forces Between Cancer Cells

Published: Tuesday, February 18, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, February 18, 2014
Bookmark and Share
JPK Instruments reports on the current cancer research project of Dr Florian T Ludwig at the Institute of Physiology II, University Hospital Münster, using a CellHesion® 200 to measure the adhesive forces between tumor cells.

JPK Instruments reports on the current cancer research project of Dr Florian T Ludwig at the Institute of Physiology II, University Hospital Münster, who uses a CellHesion® 200 to measure the adhesive forces between tumor cells.

The Institute of Physiology II is part of the Medical Faculty of the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster. It brings together the areas of physiology, cell migration and ion transporters through the study of properties of cells on the nanoscale.

Dr Florian T Ludwig is a member of the team of Professor Albrecht Schwab and Dr Christian Stock. These researchers are interested in how ion transport across the plasma membrane affects tumor cell motility and, thus, metastasis. Occurring prior to migration and invasion, one early step of the so-called metastatic cascade is the detachment of single tumor cells or cell clusters from the primary neoplasm. This process is accompanied by a controlled loss of cell-cell adhesions caused by the release of bonds between adhesion molecules such as cadherins. Hence, the adhesion force between tumor cells might predict the tumor's malignancy. Tumor cells that exhibit low cell-cell adhesion forces would represent a highly metastatic phenotype since they detach more easily.

With the help of Mike Wälte from the group of the Head of the Institute, Professor Hans Oberleithner and Dr Hermann Schillers, Dr. Ludwig measures cell-cell adhesion forces in tumor cells. This is based on the group's distinguished expertise of nearly two decades' experience in atomic force microscopy, AFM.

For the experiments, a single tumor cell is attached to the cantilever of a JPK CellHesion® 200 system using a bionic cell adhesive. A second, adherent tumor cell is then approached with the cantilever until the two cells come into contact. After a defined contact time, the cantilever is retracted until the two cells are separated. The strength of the cell-cell bonds that formed while the cells were in contact is estimated by recording the force necessary to separate the cells. Here, the key feature of the CellHesion® 200 system is its ability of the cantilever sensor lifting system to travel more than 110 µm giving a clear benefit for the researchers whose aim is to separate two tumor cells both gently, reproducibly and efficiently without damage. With the technique described here, cell-cell adhesion forces can be quantified.




Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,600+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Studying the Organisation of Genomic DNA
JPK Instruments have reported on the use of the NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system in the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics in the Leiden Institute of Chemistry at Leiden University.
Tuesday, September 09, 2014
Scientific News
Benchtop Automation Trends
Gain a better understanding of current interest in and future deployment of benchtop automated systems.
Fix for 3-Billion-Year-Old Genetic Error
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a fix that allows RNA to accurately proofread for the first time.
Higher Frequency of Huntington's Disease Mutations Discovered
University of Aberdeen study shows that the gene change that causes Huntington's disease is much more common than previously thought.
Revealing the Genetic Causes of Bowel Cancer
A landmark study has given the most detailed picture yet of the genetics of bowel cancer — the UK's fourth most common cancer.
The Epigenetic Influences of Chronic Pain
Researchers at Drexel University College of Medicine are aiming to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in pain.
Fighting Resistant Blood Cancer Cells
Biologists present new findings on chronic myeloid leukemia and possible therapeutic approaches.
Tumor Cells Develop Predictable Characteristics
Scientists have discovered that cancer cells at the edge of a tumor that are close to the surrounding environment are predictably different from the cells within the interior of the tumor.
Mothers Obesity Could be Passed on in mtDNA
Obesity can predispose offspring in multiple generations to metabolic problems.
New Imaging Method Reveals Nanoscale Details about DNA
Enhancement to super-resolution microscopy shows orientation of individual molecules, providing a new window into DNA’s structure and dynamics.
Genetic Research Can Significantly Improve Drug Development
With drug development costs topping $1.2bn (£850 million) to get a single treatment to the point it can be sold and used in the clinic, could genetic analysis save hundreds of millions of dollars?
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,600+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!