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Agilent to Host Young Scientist Forums in Asia Pacific

Published: Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, March 26, 2014
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Events provide platform for rising talents in Australia, Singapore to exchange ideas with leading scientific scholars.

Agilent Technologies Inc. announced it will kick off its Young Scientist Forum series in Asia on March 28 for emerging talents in the biomedical and life science industries. Young scientists at the Agilent-organized events, to be held in Australia and Singapore, will be able to interact, share ideas and network with senior scientists.

Experienced scientists and researchers who have worked closely with Agilent for many years will serve as hosts and mentors to facilitate the exchange of ideas with emerging talents. The young scientists will have the opportunity to present their work, engage in discussions with their mentors, and gain insights into building their careers in the dynamic life science industry. The forum will boost their knowledge across various disciplines such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

"As a technology partner to the research community, it is important that Agilent nurtures tomorrow's upcoming scientists and researchers," said Agilent's Rod Minett, general manager, Life Sciences, South Korea and the South Asia-Pacific region. "To that end, our Young Scientist Forum will provide the opportunity for young and senior scientists to interact, collaborate, share analytical issues and cover more areas of biological and clinical research. These interactions are the steps toward future developments for a healthier population."

The series begins March 28 in Melbourne, with over 70 senior and young scientists in attendance. The next event will be in Singapore on April 29; 50 attendees are expected.

Well-known life science researchers at the Young Scientist Forums will include professor Tony Bacic of the University of Melbourne, professor Graham Mitchell of Foursight Associates, Dr. Ute Rossner of the Metabolomics Australia and Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, professor Peter Preiser of Nanyang Technological University, and professor Markus Wenk of the National University of Singapore.

Agilent undertook a similar, smaller-scale event last month in South Korea, where 45 young and senior scientists met and interacted. The scientists who served as mentors at that forum included professor Eugene Lee of Seoul National University and professor Hyun-Joo An of South Korea's Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology (GRAST) at Chungnam National University.

The Young Scientist Forum is unique for Agilent in Asia. It is a new extension of the company's commitment to help connect students to opportunities. The forum is open only to young scientists and researchers who are in honors, doctorate and post-doctorate programs in the life science and integrated biology industries.

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