Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Isansys Wins Two SBRI Healthcare Development Contracts

Published: Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Isansys’ vital signs monitoring platform recognized by NHS England as a leading technology for innovation and change in healthcare delivery.

Isansys Lifecare Limited has announced that it has won two SBRI (Small Business Research Initiative) Healthcare contracts. Granted as part of NHS England’s initiative to enhance the adoption of innovative devices and new technologies, the contracts have been signed with Papworth NHS Trust (Cambridge, UK) for Isansys to expand the functionality and applications of its CE-marked Patient Status Engine (PSE) in two theme areas- patient safety and cancer.

Isansys is currently working with a number of hospitals and healthcare service providers to deliver patient monitoring services and patient status solutions based on the PSE platform.

The SBRI Healthcare awards are designed to address critical high cost areas of healthcare where the NHS has identified patient and clinician needs that are not being met. Isansys’ successful proposals have been inspired by requests from UK clinicians and nurses who have identified opportunities to extend the applications of the Patient Status Engine and realize new methods for aiding discovery and treatment.

“Every patient monitored” is the ethos behind Isansys’ SBRI Healthcare contract for improving patient safety. Through the SBRI, the NHS has contracted Isansys to re-develop and cost-reduce a number of third-party devices to be used in conjunction with the Patient Status Engine.

Applying the same low-cost and lean-design principles embodied in the company’s already successful Lifetouch™ wearable wireless cardiac monitor, Isansys will produce an integrated suite of low-cost wireless vital signs sensors that will provide new insights into the status of a patient by providing automatic data collection of five vital signs.

Combined with a bedside display and data entry screen for manual input (for example, Glasgow Coma Scales), the Patient Status Engine reimagines the way patients are monitored in, and out of, hospital. Through the economies of scale and new consumer-driven technologies, the Isansys platform will enable all patients to be monitored where and whenever needed.

For its SBRI Healthcare development contract to reduce risk in cancer patients, Isansys will reconfigure its Patients Status Engine for home use in order to monitor and analyze subtle variations in vital signs that are early warning signs of sepsis - a potentially life-threatening condition. Patients who have undergone chemotherapy face a difficult and anxious few weeks at home immediately following their treatment, many of whom could unknowingly deteriorate with sepsis.

Using multiple data streams from wireless vital sign sensors, the project team will develop a unique algorithm that will enable the detection of sepsis much earlier within the 72-hour critical period, facilitating easier, cheaper and less traumatic intervention. The Patient Status Engine allows the patients’ care teams to have remote 24/7 access to their vital sign data and early warning indicators, and also provides a communication channel to patients for real time feedback and support. This virtual “comfort blanket” will bring peace of mind and allow patients to more confidently engage in their recovery and rehabilitation programmes. By monitoring 20,000 at-risk chemotherapy patients, Isansys estimates that this solution would prevent a large number of deaths and achieve a saving of £70 million annually for the NHS.

Speaking about the announcement, co-founder of Isansys Rebecca Weir said: “Receiving these awards is a real endorsement from the NHS, and the decision makers within the NHS, of our platform solution. Whilst already in use in a number of clinical environments, the Patient Status Engine platform has the capacity to be adapted into a range of applications. We are thrilled to be exploring these with the aid of the NHS and SBRI Healthcare.”

Funded by NHS England, the Small Business Research Initiative for Healthcare (SBRI Healthcare) seeks to explore new alternatives to current known practice, with the intention of addressing ongoing difficulties in the healthcare system. The development contracts cover a six month period, to prove feasibility before being expanded to full development and delivery contracts of 18 months.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
New Tech Vastly Improves CRISPR/Cas9 Accuracy
A new CRISPR/Cas9 technology developed by scientists at UMass Medical School is precise enough to surgically edit DNA at nearly any genomic location, while avoiding potentially harmful off-target changes typically seen in standard CRISPR gene editing techniques.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Biologists Induce Flatworms to Grow Heads and Brains of Other Species
Findings shed light on role of a new kind of epigenetic signaling in evolution, could yield clues for understanding birth defects and regeneration.
Turning up the Tap on Microbes Leads to Better Protein Patenting
Mining millions of proteins could become faster and easier with a new technique that may also transform the enzyme-catalyst industry, according to University of California, Davis, researchers.
Mathematical Model Forecasts the Path of Breast Cancer
Chances of survival depend on which organs breast cancer tumors colonize first.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Tardigrade's Are DNA Master Thieves
Tardigrades, nearly microscopic animals that can survive the harshest of environments, including outer space, hold the record for the animal that has the most foreign DNA.
The Secret Behind the Power of Bacterial Sex
Migration between different communities of bacteria is the key to the type of gene transfer that can lead to the spread of traits such as antibiotic resistance, according to researchers at Oxford University.
Farming’s in Their DNA
Ancient genomes reveal natural selection in action.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos