Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

B-MS, Ono Pharmaceutical Announce Immuno-Oncology Collaboration

Published: Thursday, July 24, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, July 24, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Companies to develop and commercialize multiple immunotherapies to help address the unmet medical needs of patients with cancer in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan.

As part of the agreement, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Ono will jointly develop and commercialize Opdivo (nivolumab) and Yervoy(ipilimumab) across a broad range of tumor types.

Opdivo is a PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor approved in Japan for the treatment of patients with unresectable melanoma, making it the first PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor to receive regulatory approval anywhere in the world, and is being developed in multiple tumor types in more than 35 clinical trials.Yervoy, a CTLA-4 immune checkpoint inhibitor, is approved in Taiwan for the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma who have received prior therapy, and is in late-stage development as a potential treatment option for melanoma, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Japan. The agreement includes three additional early-stage clinical immuno-oncology assets from Bristol-Myers Squibb: lirilumab, an antibody that blocks the KIR receptor on natural killer cells, urelumab, an agonist of the CD137 co-stimulatory receptor, and BMS-986016, a LAG3 immune checkpoint inhibitor.

Bristol-Myers Squibb and Ono will jointly pursue development of monotherapy and combination regimens, with Opdivo as the foundational therapy in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, and leverage global clinical trials by including patients from the three countries.

“Bristol-Myers Squibb’s collaboration with Ono supports our goal to maximize the full potential of our immuno-oncology portfolio for patients worldwide,” said Lamberto Andreotti, chief executive officer, Bristol-Myers Squibb. “This collaboration combines our leadership in immuno-oncology with both companies’ experience and capabilities in Asia, and strengthens our long-standing relationship with Ono.”

“Our collaboration with Bristol-Myers Squibb strengthens our ability to further enhance the potential of Opdivo, for which Ono recently received manufacturing and marketing approval in Japan as the first PD-1 inhibitor approved anywhere in the world,” said Gyo Sagara, President, Representative Director and CEO, Ono. “By pursuing the study of investigational combination regimens of immunotherapies with Bristol-Myers Squibb, we hope to bring a range of new therapeutic options to cancer patients.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Ono will jointly develop and commercialize all collaboration products in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. Development costs and commercial profits will be shared equally whenOpdivo is used in combination with any Bristol-Myers Squibb compound (Yervoy, lirilumab, urelumab, BMS-986016). For a Bristol-Myers Squibb compound used as monotherapy, or two Bristol-Myers Squibb compounds used in a combination regimen, Bristol-Myers Squibb will fund the substantial majority of development costs and receive the substantial majority of commercial profits. When Opdivo is used as a single agent, Ono will fund the substantial majority of development costs and receive the substantial majority of commercial profits.

Prior to this announcement, Ono held exclusive rights to develop and commercializeOpdivo in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan while Bristol-Myers Squibb held such rights in the rest of the world, along with sole rights to develop and commercializeYervoy, lirilumab, urelumab, and BMS-986016 worldwide. The trade name Opdivo has been proposed in the U.S. and other countries, but remains subject to health authority approval.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Bristol-Myers Squibb and uniQure Enter into Strategic Collaboration
Collaboration to develop gene therapies for cardiovascular diseases.
Thursday, April 09, 2015
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pharmacyclics and Janssen Announce Clinical Collaboration
Collaboration to evaluate OPDIVO® (nivolumab) and IMBRUVICA®(ibrutinib) in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
Thursday, October 16, 2014
Bristol-Myers Squibb and Celgene Enter Clinical Collaboration Agreement
Phase I study to evaluate OPDIVO (nivolumab), Bristol-Myers Squibb’s investigational PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, with Celgene’s ABRAXANE® for multiple cancers.
Thursday, August 21, 2014
FDA Grants Breakthrough Designation for Multiple Myeloma Drug
Bristol-Myers Squibb and AbbVie received the designation for Elotuzumab, an investigational humanized monoclonal antibody for multiple myeloma.
Tuesday, May 20, 2014
Scientific News
Common Cell Transformed into Master Heart Cell
By genetically reprogramming the most common type of cell in mammalian connective tissue, researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison have generated master heart cells — primitive progenitors that form the developing heart.
Genetic Mutation that Prevents Diabetes Complications
The most significant complications of diabetes include diabetic retinal disease, or retinopathy, and diabetic kidney disease, or nephropathy. Both involve damaged capillaries.
Could the Food we Eat Affect Our Genes?
Almost all of our genes may be influenced by the food we eat, according to new research.
Neanderthal DNA Influences Human Disease Risk
Large-scale, evolutionary analysis compares genetic data alongside electronic health records.
Improving Regenerative Medicine
Lab-created stem cells may lack key characteristics, UCLA research finds.
Tick Genome Reveals Secrets of a Successful Bloodsucker
NIH has announced that decipher the genome of the blacklegged tick which could lead to new tick control methods.
"Dark Side" of the Transcriptome
New approach to quantifying gene "read-outs" reveals important variations in protein synthesis and has implications for understanding neurodegenerative diseases.
Individuals' Medical Histories Predicted by their Noncoding Genomes
Researchers have found that analyzing mutations in regions of the genome that control genes can predict medical conditions such as hypertension, narcolepsy and heart problems.
New Source of Mutations in Cancer
Recently, a new mutation signature found in cancer cells was suspected to have been created by a family of enzymes found in human cells called the APOBEC3 family.
Advancing Synthetic Biology
Living systems rely on a dizzying variety of chemical reactions essential to development and survival. Most of these involve a specialized class of protein molecules — the enzymes.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!