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U.S. Genomics Announces New Chief Executive Officer

Published: Friday, December 16, 2005
Last Updated: Friday, December 16, 2005
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John J. Canepa has been promoted to President, CEO and member of the Board of Directors.

U.S. Genomics has announced that John J. Canepa has been promoted to President, Chief Executive Officer and member of the Board of Directors.

"John's business acumen, combined with his extensive experience in the life sciences, represents an unparalleled set of qualifications to lead this company through its commercialization efforts and the next phase of its biodefense contract," said Gus Lawlor, Managing Director at HealthCare Ventures and a U.S. Genomics board member.

"We are excited to move forward in this next phase of biodefense development and commercialization of the single molecule biology technology under John's leadership."

Canepa originally joined U.S. Genomics as Chief Financial Officer. During his tenure as CFO, Canepa saw the Company through the development and launch of the Trilogy® 2020 platform and Direct™ miRNA assays and through two phases of a multi-million-dollar biodefense contract with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Prior to joining U.S. Genomics, Canepa served as Vice President, Finance & Administration, and Chief Financial Officer of Winphoria Networks, Inc., a venture capital-backed telecommunications company.

Previously he was a senior partner in the Boston office of Arthur Andersen, where he led the firm's worldwide life sciences practice.

Canepa holds a Masters in Finance from Michigan State University and a B.A. from Denison University.

"U.S. Genomics has made great strides with its biodefense work and this is an especially exciting time to be part of this company," said Canepa.

"It is a privilege to lead such a dynamic team in both the biodefense applications and the development of the Trilogy 2020 platform and assays."


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