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NextBio Life Science Search Engine Licensed by the Burnham Institute to Speed Research Across Public and Private Data

Published: Tuesday, February 05, 2008
Last Updated: Tuesday, February 05, 2008
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Under the agreement, every scientist at the Burnham Institute will gain access to the NextBio life science search engine.

NextBio has announced that it has renewed and expanded its licensing agreement with the Burnham Institute for Medical Research in San Diego, California, for the use of NextBio’s life science search engine.

Under the agreement, every scientist at the Burnham Institute will gain access to the NextBio life science search engine, enabling them to search data from both public and proprietary sources to bring their own experimental results within the context of other research findings worldwide.

“In one of our key studies, we used the NextBio search engine to interpret the gene expression changes between adenoma tumors associated with two distinct genotypes,” said Robert Oshima, Ph.D., Tumor Development Program co-Director and Professor at the Burnham Institute.

“Instead of manually evaluating hundreds of genes through literature, we were able to quickly search for conditions with similar biological changes using a combined collection of public studies. NextBio has proven to be valuable in interpreting gene expression changes in our experiments.”

“The ability of Burnham scientists to utilize huge quantities of public and internal experimental data in an easy way is fundamental to our research efforts," commented Craig Hauser, Ph.D., Cancer Center Associate Director at Burnham Institute for Medical Research. "NextBio’s life science search engine enables our researchers and clinicians to generate and validate new hypotheses using information from thousands of large-scale experimental studies.”

“We are delighted to see the Burnham Institute provide access to NextBio for its entire research staff and believe that NextBio will become an integral part of their daily research,” said Ilya Kupershmidt, NextBio’s Vice President of Product Management. ”We are very pleased that Burnham, as one of our pioneering customers, has renewed and expanded its license to use NextBio.”


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