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The Easigel H1-Set: The fast mini horizontal

Product Description
Scie-Plas™ Green Range™ horizontal gel electrophoresis units offer the ultimate standards in innovative design and manufacture, acquired during our 20-year existence. The Scie-Plas Green Range horizontal gel electrophoresis units currently comprise models with gel tray sizes ranging from 6 x 7.5 to 25 x 30cm. All models incorporate many design and safety features recommended by scientists, either from within our in-house product development team or laboratories worldwide. As a result, all our models are manufactured and finished to the highest specification, easy to use, and, with safety always paramount, CE-marked - conforming to European safety regulations.

The Easigel H1-SET offers a swift and simple horizontal gel electrophoresis solution for standard preparative and analytical studies of nucleic acids.

The Easigel's compact design minimises the buffer volume required to cover the gel, giving the user optimal control over the voltage gradient and run-time. Plastic casting gates allow direct gel-casting within the tank without the need for costly accessories, while two 1mm thick combs provide a 16-sample throughput.

The Easigel's small size enables it to be easily carried from the bench to the UV transilluminator. UV-transparent acrylic permits visualisation of the gel within the tank, limiting the user's exposure to hazardous ethidium bromide. A quick release lid disconnects the tank and lid simultaneously from the power supply, facilitating safe access to the gel for loading and disposal.


Complete System
Easigelâ„¢ horizontal gel unit with built-in casting tray and 2 x 1.5mm thick, 8-sample combs.
Unit Dimensions (W x L x H): 13.5 x 24 x 6.5cm
Gel Dimensions (W x L): 10 x 8cm
Minimum Buffer Volume: 50ml
Maximum Sample Capacity: 40
Recommended Power Supplies: Consort EV222
Product The Easigel H1-Set: The fast mini horizontal
Company Scie-Plas Ltd
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
Catalog Number Unspecified
Quantity 1
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Scie-Plas Ltd
22 Cambridge Science Park Milton Road Cambridge CB4 0FJ UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1223 427888
Fax: +44 (0) 1223 420164

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