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Using Next-Gen Sequencing to Uncover Patterns of Allele-Specific Expression

Sergio Baranzini, Associate Professor, University of California, San Francisco, speaking at Epigenetics World Congress 2011.
Date Posted: Wednesday, December 07, 2011
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