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Fragment-Based Screening and Structure-Based Design at ICR: Discovering High Quality Leads in Cancer Drug Discovery

Rob Van Montfort, Institute of Cancer Research, speaking at Discovery Chemistry Conference 2012.
Date Posted: Tuesday, October 09, 2012
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