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  Events - September 2013


Your body is 3D, why is your cell culture not?

27 Sep 2013 - 27 Sep 2013 - Webinar



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3D cell-based applications close the gap between conventional in-vitro approaches and in vivo animal model research. By automating the 3D cell culture process and assay detection in a microplate based format, this significantly shortens development time of new drug candidates as well as offering more reliable statistical results.   

Tecan will present solutions for 3D cell culture systems using the Alvetex (Reinnervate), RAFT (TAP Biosystems)  scaffold based, and GravityPlus (InSphero) scaffold-free technology. In particular, automating a 3D cell culture system with the Freedom EVO® liquid handling platform offers a simple and reliable approach for cultivation, and the Infinite M-200 PRO multi-detection reader with its Optimal Read function in conjunction with the patent pending Gas Control Module (GCMTM) offers an excellent solution for acute and chronic toxicity tests, as well as multiplexed assays in cancer research.

Presenter:
Christian Oberdanner, PhD
Application Specialist Sales & Marketing, Tecan Austria GmbH

Christian Oberdanner, PhD, studied Molecular- and Cell-Biology at the University of Salzburg, Austria. In his doctoral thesis he focused on Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated apoptosis induction in photodynamic cancer therapy. 

Christian started to work for Tecan Austria as an external scientific consultant already during his last year at University. After his graduation he joined Tecan as Application Specialist in the department for research and development but quickly changed to the sales and marketing department. His expertise is on applications for Tecan’s multimode readers and microplate washers but he is also contributing to new product developments as a Junior Product Manager.


Further information
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