Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genotyping & Gene Expression
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Body Clock Receptor Linked to Diabetes in New Genetic Study

Published: Tuesday, January 31, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, January 31, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Study found that people who carry rare genetic mutations in the receptor for melatonin have higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

A study published in Nature Genetics has found new evidence for a link between the body clock hormone melatonin and type 2 diabetes.

The study found that people who carry rare genetic mutations in the receptor for melatonin have a much higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

The findings should help scientists to more accurately assess personal diabetes risk and could lead to the development of personalized treatments.

Previous research has found that people who work night shifts have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Studies have also found that if volunteers have their sleep disrupted repeatedly for three days, they temporarily develop symptoms of diabetes.

The body's sleep-wake cycle is controlled by the hormone melatonin, which has effects including drowsiness and lowering body temperature.

In 2008, a genetic study led by Imperial College London discovered that people with common variations in the gene for MT2, a receptor for melatonin, have a slightly higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

The new study reveals that carrying any of four rare mutations in the MT2 gene increases a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes six times.

The release of insulin, which regulates blood sugar levels, is known to be regulated by melatonin.

The researchers suggest that mutations in the MT2 gene may disrupt the link between the body clock and insulin release, leading to abnormal control of blood sugar.

Professor Philippe Froguel, from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, who led the study, said: "Blood sugar control is one of the many processes regulated by the body's biological clock. This study adds to our understanding of how the gene that carries the blueprint for a key component in the clock can influence people's risk of diabetes.

"We found very rare variants of the MT2 gene that have a much larger effect than more common variants discovered before. Although each mutation is rare, they are common in the sense that everyone has a lot of very rare mutations in their DNA. Cataloguing these mutations will enable us to much more accurately assess a person's risk of disease based on their genetics."

In the study, the Imperial team and their collaborators at several institutions in the UK and France examined the MT2 gene in 7,632 people to look for more unusual variants that have a bigger effect on disease risk.

They found 40 variants associated with type 2 diabetes, four of which were very rare and rendered the receptor completely incapable of responding to melatonin. The scientists then confirmed the link with these four variants in an additional sample of 11,854 people.

Professor Froguel and his team analyzed each mutation by testing what effect they have on the MT2 receptor in human cells in the lab.

The mutations that completely prevented the receptor from working proved to have a very big effect on diabetes risk, suggesting that there is a direct link between MT2 and the disease.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,900+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Gene Expression Controls Revealed
Researchers have modelled every atom in a key part of the process for switching on genes, revealing a whole new area for potential drug targets.
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
Breakthrough Could Lead to New Antibiotics
Scientists have exposed a chink in the armour of disease-causing bugs, with a new discovery about a protein that controls bacterial defences.
Friday, August 21, 2015
New Drug Target Identified for Serious Heart and Lung Condition
A gene has been identified that sheds new light on a potentially fatal heart and lung condition and could lead to a new treatment.
Friday, August 14, 2015
New Genetic Form of Obesity and Diabetes Discovered
Scientists have discovered a new inherited form of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.
Tuesday, June 30, 2015
New Genetic Form of Obesity and Diabetes Discovered
Scientists have discovered a new inherited form of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.
Tuesday, June 30, 2015
New 'Systems Genetics' Study Identifies Possible Target For Epilepsy Treatment
A single gene that coordinates a network of about 400 genes involved in epilepsy could be a target for new treatments, according to research.
Friday, January 23, 2015
Biomarker Discovery Sheds New Light on Heart Attack Risk of Arthritis Drugs
Drug may be given a new lease of life.
Thursday, December 11, 2014
Genetic Discovery Could Aid Diagnosis of Childhood TB
A distinctive genetic 'signature' found in the blood of children with TB offers new hope for improved diagnosis of the disease.
Thursday, May 01, 2014
New Technology Could Slash Sequencing Time
Scientists from Imperial College London are developing technology that could ultimately sequence a person's genome in mere minutes, at a fraction of the cost of current commercial techniques.
Monday, December 20, 2010
Swine Flu: Early Findings about Pandemic Potential Reported in new Study
Early findings about the emerging pandemic of a new strain of influenza A (H1N1) in Mexico published in Science.
Tuesday, May 12, 2009
Study Suggests Listening to Pleasant Music Could Help Restore Vision in Stroke Patients
Patients who have lost part of their visual awareness following a stroke can show an improved ability to see when they are listening to music they like, according to a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Tuesday, March 24, 2009
Schizophrenia Linked to Signaling Problems in New Brain Study
The study supports the theory that abnormalities in the way in which cells 'talk' to each other are involved in the disease.
Wednesday, March 04, 2009
HIV Treatment Test Closer to Manufacture with new $7.3 Million Grant
The CD4 Initiative will use the grant received from Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to develop a point-of-care test for HIV/AIDS patients.
Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Alzheimer's Disease Patients Show Improvement in Trial of new Drug
A new drug has been shown to improve the brain function of Alzheimer's patients and reduce a key protein associated with the disease in the spinal fluid.
Wednesday, July 30, 2008
Breast Cancer Researchers Call for Ethnicity to be Taken into Account When Developing Treatments
Breast cancer research needs to investigate how a person's ethnicity influences their response to treatment and its outcome, Imperial researchers say.
Monday, July 21, 2008
Scientific News
Detecting Alzheimer's with Smell Test
Odour identification test may offer low-cost alternative for predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.
Fighting Cancer Through Protein Pathways
Researchers have found a new drug target within a protein production pathway critical to regulating growth and proliferation of cells.
Ice Bucket Challenge Instrumental in Gene Discovery
Donations from the ALS Ice Bucket Chellenge allowed for the largest-ever study of inherited ALS, which identified a new ALS gene.
Cancer Gene-Drug Combinations Ripe for Precision Medicine
The study aims to expand the number of cancer gene mutations that can be paired with a precision therapy.
New Centre Offers Ultra-Speed Protein Analysis
UW-Madison researchers to establish development centre for next-gen protein measurement technologies.
Disrupting Tumour-Promotion in Humans
Researchers have modified an existing protein to represses a specific cancer-promoting ‘message’ within cells.
Drug - Gene 'One-Two' Punch Against Cancer
Researchers identify gene-drug combinations that, together, target and kill cancer cells while not targeting healthy cells.
Drug Candidates Reduce Abnormal Protein Production
New drug candidates improve cell ability to catch miss-folded proteins that could cause deadly diseases.
Liquid Biopsies Treating Ovarian Cancer
Researchers have discovered a promising monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer. Detecting cancer long before tumours reappear.
Diagnostic Thread - Weaving the Future?
Researchers have created diagnostic threads that could pave the way for next-gen implantable and wearable diagnostics.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,900+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!