Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genotyping & Gene Expression
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Integromics Invests in the Optimization of Computing Performance for Bioinformatics Applications

Published: Friday, March 22, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, March 22, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Key collaboration with European experts of HPC to bring new big-data computing solutions into genomics.

Integromics® has announced that it has entered into a consortium for the research on new methods to process quickly and efficiently the large sets of data that are produced in genomics studies, typically based on Next Generation Sequencing technology, and their subsequent application in the early detection of drug reactions and allergies.

Information Technology is intimately coupled to research and modern society, providing solutions, speed and efficiency to perform tasks that until a few decades ago were, in practice, impossible to carry out.

Every day, huge amounts of data are processed by high performance computers and office workstations, and more recently by mobile devices like tablets and smartphones.

This is precisely the reality of genomics research where, for example, the sequence of a single human genome requires about 3 gigabytes (3000 megabytes) of storage.

Following the emergence of these "big" datasets and the need to work with them, experts have begun to think about solutions to optimize the analysis and management of what has been called big-data or macro-data.

The Mr. SymBioMath collaboration, funded with more than 2.6 million euros by the Seventh Framework Programme for R & D of the European Union and coordinated by the Laboratory of Bioinformatics and Information Technology of the University of Malaga-UMA (Spain), has been designed to provide solutions to these needs through the synergy between Integromics (Spain), the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre in Munich-LRZ (Germany), the Johannes Kepler University of Linz-JKU (Austria), RISC Software (Austria) and Carlos Haya Hospital (Spain).

The Mr. SymBioMath project will result in new software applications and data analysis methods to accelerate genomics adoption in the clinical domain.

At the level of computation, the research will be focused on two major challenges: transmission of large volumes of data and optimization of genetic comparison models and visualizations.

JKU will be responsible for creating new models for comparative genomics, evolutionary distances between different organisms, and identification of correlations between genetic variation and phenotypic response of patients to particular treatments.

The supercomputing infrastructure will be provided by the UMA and RISC. They will also develop applications to deliver, collect and display test information.

LRZ will focus on the provisioning of enhanced visualization and Virtual Reality hardware and software for the analysis of the interconnected huge genomic datasets in this project.

The final implementation into commercial software will be done by Integromics.

"Integromics will contribute from a commercial perspective”, said Juan Elvira, CTO of Integromics, “in the design of applications compatible with both computer and tablets-smartphones”.

At the clinical level, Miguel Blanco, Chief of Allergy Carlos Haya Hospital, explained that the project will use data available in the National Allergy Network to validate the software solutions.

The project leader, Dr. Oswaldo Trelles, highlighted that one of the strengths of this study is its focus on medical practice. "The solutions we seek”, he says, “are targeted to a wide range of scientific applications, with personalized medicine certainly being one of them.

Indeed, one of the objectives is to implement applications prototypes applied in real use case scenarios and to evaluate their potential for detecting from genomic data of allergic patients the possible adverse reactions to treatment”.

The Mr. SymBioMath project represents an ideal opportunity for Integromics to reinforce its commitment to the development of software solutions for personalized medicine applied to the clinics.

“This grant and collaboration with renowned computing experts will contribute to the democratization of genomics, in particular through the usage of mobile devices”, said Eduardo González Couto, CSO of Integromics.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Integromics Partners with CITRE and CEIT
Venture attracts EUR 2 million grant for ‘new frontier’ of data interpretation for drug development.
Friday, April 19, 2013
Integromics Partners with FPGMX to Develop Low-Cost Methods for Clinical Genomics
Venture attracts EUR one million grant for ‘new frontier’ of data interpretation for medical usage.
Tuesday, February 07, 2012
Novel Polyadenylation Genome-wide Profiling Achieved using Next Generation Sequencing Software
A paper published in the journal Cell highlighting a novel genome wide profile of polyadenylation events in human and yeast, performed with Direct RNA Sequencing, demonstrated the importance of appropriate bioinformatics software in maximizing the value of the genomic data.
Monday, January 10, 2011
Scientific News
Genetic Basis of Fatal Flu Side Effect Discovered
A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a recent study.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Mathematical Model Forecasts the Path of Breast Cancer
Chances of survival depend on which organs breast cancer tumors colonize first.
Ancient Viral Molecules Essential for Human Development
Genetic material from ancient viral infections is critical to human development, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Measuring microRNAs in Blood to Speed Cancer Detection
A simple, ultrasensitive microRNA sensor holds promise for the design of new diagnostic strategies and, potentially, for the prognosis and treatment of pancreatic and other cancers.
Personalized Drug Screening for Multiple Myeloma Patients
A personalized method for testing the effectiveness of drugs that treat multiple myeloma may predict quickly and more accurately the best treatments for individual patients with the bone marrow cancer.
Metabolic Profiles Distinguish Early Stage Ovarian Cancer with Unprecedented Accuracy
Studying blood serum compounds of different molecular weights has led scientists to a set of biomarkers that may enable development of a highly accurate screening test for early-stage ovarian cancer.
New Way to Force Stem Cells to Become Bone Cells
Potential therapies based on this discovery could help people heal bone injuries or set hardware, such as replacement knees and hips.
Promise of Newborn Stem Cells to Revolutionize Clinical Practice
In this article Shweta Sharma, PhD, discusses the potential of an Umbilical Cord Blood bank as an untapped source of samples for research and clinical trials.
New Anti-Malarial Drug Screening Model
University of South Florida researchers demonstrate novel chemogenomic profiling to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos