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Molecular Devices to Attend Fourth Annual European Lab Automation (ELA) 2014

Published: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
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Molecular Devices® will be showcasing the next generation SpectraMax® MiniMax™ 300 imaging cytometer.

The SpectraMax® MiniMax™ 300 imaging cytometer enables both cellular visualization and first-of-its-kind stain free cell-based analysis on the field-upgradable SpectraMax®i3 Multi-Mode Microplate Reader at ELA 2014 (Hall 8, Booths 23 & 24) in Barcelona from 13 May 2014. Also on show, enabling both ELISAs and Western Blot on one plate reader, the new ScanLater™ Western Blot Detection System is the first western blot application for a microplate reader.

The SpectraMax MiniMax 300 Imaging Cytometer now features the patent-pending StainFree™ Cell Detection algorithm, which enables cell confluency and cell counting measurements on an imaging plate reader without the need for destructive stains, saving researchers valuable time and money. With two additional fluorescence detection channels; green and red, researchers may now perform and analyze a wide range of cellular viability and cell toxicity assays, including ratiometric assays such as transfection efficiency. The SpectraMax i3 system offers three integrated detection modes; luminescence, absorbance, and fluorescence, while its flexible design enables a wide array of assay possibilities. The patented user-exchangeable cartridge design expands the system's detection capabilities with cartridges like the recently launched ScanLater™ Western Blot Detection System, which enables protein analysis on a plate reader. 

The SpectraMax i3 platform with MiniMax 300 Imaging Cytometer and ScanLater Western Blot System are all managed through SoftMax® Pro Data Acquisition and Analysis Software, recognized industry-wide for its ease of use. With simple to set-up plate reader prompts and pre-defined analysis features, results are realized and analyzed quickly. The SpectraMax i3 System is also available for use in GMP and GLP labs when used with SoftMax® Pro 6 GxP Microplate Data Compliance Software. The highly sensitive instrument accommodates the budget and throughput needs of both small and large laboratories alike. Combining cellular imaging with microplate-based applications offers new ways for scientists to compress their workflows and increase efficiency. 

Also on show will be the  ImageXpress® Micro XLS System; a widefield high content microscope capable of providing automated cellular imaging in fluorescent, transmitted light, and phase-contrast modes for fixed- or live-cell assays. 

Flexibility, speed and quality are assured with 3X field-of-view, industry-leading stage and autofocus control, a broad range of research-grade objective lenses, multiple filter options, and a gallery of MetaXpress®  Software solutions to optimize and speed up image analysis. A modular system design enables instrument enhancements for assays ranging from simple label-free imaging to long-term monitoring of cellular responses, compound addition and post-wash recovery. Individual cells can be tracked during multi-day time-lapse experiments.


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