Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genotyping & Gene Expression
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Molecular Devices to Attend Fourth Annual European Lab Automation (ELA) 2014

Published: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Molecular Devices® will be showcasing the next generation SpectraMax® MiniMax™ 300 imaging cytometer.

The SpectraMax® MiniMax™ 300 imaging cytometer enables both cellular visualization and first-of-its-kind stain free cell-based analysis on the field-upgradable SpectraMax®i3 Multi-Mode Microplate Reader at ELA 2014 (Hall 8, Booths 23 & 24) in Barcelona from 13 May 2014. Also on show, enabling both ELISAs and Western Blot on one plate reader, the new ScanLater™ Western Blot Detection System is the first western blot application for a microplate reader.

The SpectraMax MiniMax 300 Imaging Cytometer now features the patent-pending StainFree™ Cell Detection algorithm, which enables cell confluency and cell counting measurements on an imaging plate reader without the need for destructive stains, saving researchers valuable time and money. With two additional fluorescence detection channels; green and red, researchers may now perform and analyze a wide range of cellular viability and cell toxicity assays, including ratiometric assays such as transfection efficiency. The SpectraMax i3 system offers three integrated detection modes; luminescence, absorbance, and fluorescence, while its flexible design enables a wide array of assay possibilities. The patented user-exchangeable cartridge design expands the system's detection capabilities with cartridges like the recently launched ScanLater™ Western Blot Detection System, which enables protein analysis on a plate reader. 

The SpectraMax i3 platform with MiniMax 300 Imaging Cytometer and ScanLater Western Blot System are all managed through SoftMax® Pro Data Acquisition and Analysis Software, recognized industry-wide for its ease of use. With simple to set-up plate reader prompts and pre-defined analysis features, results are realized and analyzed quickly. The SpectraMax i3 System is also available for use in GMP and GLP labs when used with SoftMax® Pro 6 GxP Microplate Data Compliance Software. The highly sensitive instrument accommodates the budget and throughput needs of both small and large laboratories alike. Combining cellular imaging with microplate-based applications offers new ways for scientists to compress their workflows and increase efficiency. 

Also on show will be the  ImageXpress® Micro XLS System; a widefield high content microscope capable of providing automated cellular imaging in fluorescent, transmitted light, and phase-contrast modes for fixed- or live-cell assays. 

Flexibility, speed and quality are assured with 3X field-of-view, industry-leading stage and autofocus control, a broad range of research-grade objective lenses, multiple filter options, and a gallery of MetaXpress®  Software solutions to optimize and speed up image analysis. A modular system design enables instrument enhancements for assays ranging from simple label-free imaging to long-term monitoring of cellular responses, compound addition and post-wash recovery. Individual cells can be tracked during multi-day time-lapse experiments.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Registration opens for RNAi and High Content Imaging 2011
Molecular Devices Inc. announces that they have opened registration for its RNAi & High Content Imaging Symposium 2011, to be held at the Oxford Spires Four Pillars, Oxford on 1st April 2011.
Tuesday, February 08, 2011
Scientific News
Five New Genetic Variants Linked to Brain Cancer Identified
The biggest ever study of DNA from people with glioma – the most common form of brain cancer – has discovered five new genetic variants associated with the disease.
Predictive Model for Breast Cancer Progression
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated a proof-of-principle technique that could give women and their oncologists more personalized information to help them choose options for treating breast cancer.
New Hope for Personalized Treatment of Eczema
Pharmaceutical researchers at Oregon State University have developed a new approach to treat eczema and other inflammatory skin disorders that would use individual tests and advanced science to create personalized treatments based on each person's lipid deficiencies.
Gene Expression: A Snapshot of Stem Cell Development
New genes found that regulate development of stem cells.
Are Changes to Current Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines Required?
Editorial suggests more research is needed to pinpoint age to end aggressive screening.
Assessing Cancer Patient Survival and Drug Sensitivity
RNA editing events another way to investigate biomarkers and therapy targets.
New Molecular Marker for Killer Cells
Cell marker enables prognosis about the course of infections.
Genes That Protect African Children From Developing Malaria Identified
Variations in DNA at a specific location on the genome that protect African children from developing severe malaria, in some cases nearly halving a child’s chance of developing the life-threatening disease, have been identified in the largest genetic association study of malaria to date.
Sniffing Out Cancer
Scientists have been exploring new ways to “smell” signs of cancer by analyzing what’s in patients’ breath.
New Test Detects All Viruses
A new test detects virtually any virus that infects people and animals, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, where the technology was developed.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos