Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genotyping & Gene Expression
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Exiqon Launches XploreRNA™ app for Advanced Cross-Database Queries

Published: Tuesday, May 13, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 13, 2014
Bookmark and Share
XploreRNA™ will soon be available on Android and Windows platforms.

Exiqon A/S has announced the launch of its XploreRNA™ app for advanced cross-database searches, easy interpretation of data and seamless planning of experiments.

XploreRNA™ allows scientists engaged in transcription analysis to scroll any transcript, view splice sites, SNPs, and to zoom in on specific transcripts of interest in an interactive interface. Major databases including Ensembl, miRBase etc., have been cross-annotated to provide for all-in-one searches. Relevant abstracts and original publications have been integrated through PubMed. Products are automatically customized to address search results and readily ordered.

The body of biological data is growing exponentially which makes it challenging for scientists to stay abreast and benefit from big data. To complicate matters different annotations of major databases make cross-database searches time consuming and complicate the identification of relevant genetic information, e.g. microRNA-mRNA interactions. XploreRNA™ overcomes all of these challenges, and is the first in a series of new apps from Exiqon for scientists in both academia and industry.

XploreRNA™ enables “on-the-fly” discussions based on cross-annotated scientific information that is now made available at users fingertips. Results may be easily shared and converted to studies of relevant gene expressions whether for validation purposes or functional analysis.

“An important value proposition for Exiqon is to guide our customers through experimental data, to reach scientific conclusions and make decisions on how to validate data. The XploreRNA™ app does all of this for our customers and requires no prior knowledge about complicated database searches” says Henrik M. Pfundheller, SVP, Sales and Marketing and continues “Should our customers be interested in conducting further experiments the XploreRNA™ will suggest the relevant customized LNA® enhanced products directly available for ordering”.

XploreRNA™ is currently available on iOS platforms but will soon also be available on Android and Windows platforms.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,600+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Biomarkers for Profiling Prostate Cancer Patients
Exiqon A/S has announced the publication of validation of prognostic microRNA biomarkers for the aggressiveness of prostate cancer in independent cohorts.
Monday, April 25, 2016
Exiqon Licenses Biomarkers From Aarhus University Hospital
Exiqon A/S has exclusively licensed prostate cancer biomarkers discovered and validated by Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Molecular Medicine (MOMA).
Wednesday, December 03, 2014
Exiqon and Asuragen Sign Agreement for Real-Time PCR Services
The Service Center Agreement allows Asuragen to provide real-time PCR services based on Exiqon’s miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT microRNA PCR products.
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
Exiqon partners with MedTrust Online to Promote Molecular Oncology Diagnostic Services to Oncologists
Exiqon will provide a comprehensive suite of oncology molecular diagnostics services to MedTrust Online's Oncocentric oncology portal.
Wednesday, June 03, 2009
Exiqon A/S appoints permanent CEO

Monday, February 24, 2003
Scientific News
Fix for 3-Billion-Year-Old Genetic Error
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a fix that allows RNA to accurately proofread for the first time.
“Amazing Protein Diversity” Discovered in Maize
The genome of the corn plant – or maize, as it’s called almost everywhere except the US – “is a lot more exciting” than scientists have previously believed. So says the lead scientist in a new effort to analyze and annotate the depth of the plant’s genetic resources.
Higher Frequency of Huntington's Disease Mutations Discovered
University of Aberdeen study shows that the gene change that causes Huntington's disease is much more common than previously thought.
Revealing the Genetic Causes of Bowel Cancer
A landmark study has given the most detailed picture yet of the genetics of bowel cancer — the UK's fourth most common cancer.
Tumor Cells Develop Predictable Characteristics
Scientists have discovered that cancer cells at the edge of a tumor that are close to the surrounding environment are predictably different from the cells within the interior of the tumor.
New Imaging Method Reveals Nanoscale Details about DNA
Enhancement to super-resolution microscopy shows orientation of individual molecules, providing a new window into DNA’s structure and dynamics.
Genetic Research Can Significantly Improve Drug Development
With drug development costs topping $1.2bn (£850 million) to get a single treatment to the point it can be sold and used in the clinic, could genetic analysis save hundreds of millions of dollars?
Diagnosing Systemic Infections Quickly, Reliably
Team develop rapid and specific diagnostic assay that could help physicians decide within an hour whether a patient has a systemic infection and should be hospitalized for aggressive intervention therapy.
What Makes a Good Scientist?
It’s the journey, not just the destination that counts as a scientist when conducting research.
Scoliosis Linked to Disruptions in Spinal Fluid Flow
A new study in zebrafish suggests that irregular fluid flow through the spinal column brought on by gene mutations is linked to a type of scoliosis that can affect humans during adolescence.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,600+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!