Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genotyping & Gene Expression
Scientific Community
 
Join | Sign in
Home>Videos>This Video
  Videos

Return

Results From Serum-Tumorautoantibody Profiling of Breast, Colon, Lung and Prostate Cancers Using a 16k Protein Array for Improving Minimal Invasive Diagnostics
Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH

Andreas Weinhäusel, Senior Scientist, Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH

Abstract
In Europe there were an estimated 3.2 million new cases of cancer in 2008. The most commonly reported cases in Europe were colorectal cancers ( 13.6%), breast cancer (13.1%), lung cancer (12.2%) and prostate cancer (11.9%). These 4 big cancer entities make up more than 50% of all cancers. It is well accepted that early detection of cancer does improve patient survival, thus there is a pressing need to improve early cancer detection.  This can be best fulfilled by an easy and simple test suitable for minimal invasive testing. Tumour-associated antigens (TAA) can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis and thus would be ideal biomarkers for early detection of cancer using only a few microliters of a patient's serum.We have developed an 16k protein-microarray using the UNIPEX human cDNA expression library. During methods optimization we studies the influence of different serum and plasma sampling procedures and finally came up with an optimized protocol using purified IgG from samples for TAA profiling. This protocol enabled definition of TAA classifier panels with very promising classification success of patients versus controls for the big 4 cancer entities. Currently we set up targeted microarrays for validation of our screening results. In addition in silico design of antigenic peptides from sero-reactive clone-sequences has also been conducted and preliminary data enabled an improved classification compared to corresponding proteins. Thus multiplexed protein and peptide based serum-analyses could further improve cancer diagnostics

Request more information
Company product page



For access to this article, enter your email address to instantly recieve a Password Reset link.

Please enter your email address below:

Existing users please Sign In here. Don't have an account? Register Here for free access.

Don't have an account? | Register Here

Scientific News
Genome Study Predicts DNA of the Whole of Iceland
Large genome databases are starting to reveal critical health information-even about people who have not contributed their DNA.
Genetic Mutation Helps Explain Why, In Rare Cases, Flu Can Kill
Study shows that immune response to flu can be affected by a rare genetic mutation.
New Autism-Causing Genetic Variant Identified
Novel approach expected to be useful for other diseases too.
Genetics Help Predict Heart Disease Risk, Statin Benefits
Researchers found that a set of genetic variants could identify people at risk for coronary heart disease and who would benefit most from statin therapy.
Kidney Cancer Detected Early With Urine Test
Washington University School of Medicine researchers have developed a noninvasive method to screen for kidney cancer by measuring the presence of proteins in the urine.
New Gene Influences Apple or Pear Shape, Risk of Future Disease
Duke researchers have discovered that a gene called Plexin D1 controls both where fat is stored and how fat cells are shaped.
Molecule Controls Stem Cell Plasticity By Boosting Gene Expression
Sox9 appears to lead the activation of super-enhancers that boost genes associated with stem cell plasticity.
The First Fine-Scale Genetic Map Of The British Isles
Many people in the UK feel a strong sense of regional identity, and it now appears that there may be a scientific basis to this feeling, according to a landmark new study into the genetic makeup of the British Isles.
Gene Discovery Provides Clues To How TB May Evade The Immune System
The largest genetic study of TB susceptibility to date has led to a potentially important new insight into how the pathogen manages to evade the immune system.
Honey, I Shrunk The Ants: How Environment Controls Size
Ground breaking epigenetics research has implications for everything from cancer to farming.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters