Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genotyping & Gene Expression
Scientific Community
 
Join | Sign in
Home>Videos>This Video
  Videos

Return

Tumour Regression after Intravenous Administration of Novel Tumour-targeted Nanomedicines
SELECTBIO

The possibility of using genes as medicines to treat cancer is limited by the lack of safe and efficacious delivery systems able to deliver therapeutic genes selectively to tumours by intravenous administration, without secondary effects to healthy tissues. In order to remediate to this problem, we investigated if the conjugation of the polypropylenimine dendrimer to transferrin, whose receptors are overexpressed on numerous cancers, could result in a selective gene delivery to tumours after intravenous administration, leading to an increased therapeutic efficacy. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the targeting and therapeutic efficacies of a novel transferrin-bearing polypropylenimine dendrimer. The intravenous administration of transferrin-bearing polypropylenimine polyplex resulted in gene expression mainly in the tumours. Consequently, the intravenous administration of the delivery system complexed to a therapeutic DNA encoding TNF led to a rapid and sustained tumour regression over one month (90% complete response, 10% partial response on A431 human epidermoid tumours). It also resulted in tumour suppression for 60% of PC-3 and 50% of DU145 prostate tumours. The treatment was well tolerated by the animals, with no apparent signs of toxicity. Transferrin-bearing polypropylenimine is therefore a highly promising delivery system for cancer therapy

Request more information
Company product page


Access to this article and other content is for registered users.

Join the Technology Networks Community

  • Access to the latest scientific news, products and research through Technology Networks
  • Upload and share your posters on ePosters
  • View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
  • A library of 3,000+ scientific videos on LabTube


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you already have an account with Technology Networks, please use your existing login details. If you do not yet have an account please join here.

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
New Online Tool to Predict Genetic Resistance to Tuberculosis Drugs
New free online tool, TB-Profiler, analyses and interprets genome sequence data.
Sperm Motility Gene Linked to Height
A team of scientists believe they have identified the association between human height and a specific gene found in sperm.
Imaging Test May Identify Biomarker of Alzheimer's Disease
Degeneration of the white matter of the brain may be an early marker of specific types of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including early-onset AD, according to results recently published.
Sistemic, RoosterBio Collaborate
This is a collaboration and memorandum of understanding to combine their technologies to advance mesenchymal stem/stromal (MSC) regenerative technology.
Scientists Win Grant to Expand Study of Innovative Obesity Therapy
The grant is to advance an innovative approach to the treatment of obesity, a serious health problem that affects more than one-third of all Americans.
‘Rosetta Stone’ for Prostate Cancer Mutations
Scientists have produced a comprehensive genetic map of the mutations in prostate cancer that have spread across the body.
Two New and Very Large Classes of RNAs Linked to a Cancer Biomarker Identified
Study shows two new classes of RNAs could play a role in progression of prostate cancer.
DNA Mutations get Harder to Hide
Rice University researchers have developed a method to detect rare DNA mutations with an approach hundreds of times more powerful than current methods.
Discovery of Pain-sensing Gene Key to New Relief Methods
A gene essential to the production of pain-sensing neurons in humans has been identified by an international team of researchers co-led by the University of Cambridge.
Researchers Find “Decoder Ring” Powers in microRNA
MicroRNA can serve as a "decoder ring" for understanding complex biological processes, a team of New York Univ. chemists has found.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters