Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

University of Dundee First to Install Biacore 4000 SPR System

Published: Wednesday, June 16, 2010
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 16, 2010
Bookmark and Share
The system will be used to focus on developing biophysical fragment based screening methodologies for efficient drug discovery.

The University of Dundee announced that it has become the first facility worldwide to take delivery of Biacore™ 4000. Biacore 4000 is a solution for large-scale, label-free molecular interaction analysis in drug discovery, from early screening to characterization.

The University of Dundee and spin-out company Kinetic Discovery Ltd will be using the system to focus on developing biophysical fragment based screening methodologies for efficient drug discovery.

Dr Iva Navratilova, Independent Investigator, University of Dundee and founder of Kinetic Discovery, commented:  “We are developing biosensor based screening methods that enable us to characterize the kinetics and thermodynamics of molecular interactions. The unprecedented combination of high sample capacity and sensitivity provided by Biacore 4000 means we can now carry out highly accurate screening of our fragment library in only a couple of days, rather than the weeks it would have otherwise taken.”

Dr. Navratilova also plans to use Biacore 4000 to continue her work on developing biosensor SPR methods for screening native membrane proteins such as GPCRs, an important class of drug targets. SPR is used to characterize complex kinetic interactions of GPCRs with their natural ligands or low molecular weight inhibitors. The system is designed for large-scale parallel interaction analyses, with the capability to analyze up to 4800 interactions in 24hrs, ideal for running biophysical screening campaigns on selected compound libraries.

Structural methods used for fragment screening present several technical challenges, including consumption of large amounts of target protein, and a requirement for high sample concentrations due to the low (typically micromolar to millimolar) affinities exhibited by fragments, which leads to solubility/non-specific binding issues. SPR-based strategies can be designed to overcome many of these issues, providing an efficient, informative complement to structural methods. The kinetic information obtained can then be used to support further compound optimization efforts.

“We’re very excited to be the first facility to install a Biacore 4000 instrument”, said Prof. Andrew Hopkins, Chair of Medicinal Informatics and SULSA Research Professor of Translational Biology, University of Dundee, and CEO of Kinetic Discovery: “We believe this reinforces our position as a world leader in the field of SPR based fragment screening, and we look forward to seeing the many benefits the purchase will make to our research efforts.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Dundee Researchers Seek to Beat "Molecular Obesity"
Researchers from the University of Dundee have come up with a new innovative approach in the quest to reduce failure rates in the drug discovery process.
Thursday, January 26, 2012
Visualising the Problem may help to Improve Antibiotics
Researchers from the Universities of Dundee and Oxford have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how resistance to antibiotics might be overcome, by producing the first ever 3D molecular image of a key drug target and showing how drugs bind to it.
Monday, January 17, 2011
New Programme Leader Appointed to Dundee MRC Unit
MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit recruits Dr Ian Ganley from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
Tuesday, March 02, 2010
Dundee Centre to Focus on Cancer Prevention and Screening
Cancer experts from across a wide range of disciplines at the University of Dundee are to pool their efforts to push forward research into developing effective programmes of prevention and early screening for the disease.
Monday, October 26, 2009
Scientific News
Charting Kidney Cancer Metabolism
Changes in cell metabolism are increasingly recognized as an important way tumors develop and progress, yet these changes are hard to measure and interpret. A new tool designed by MSK scientists allows users to identify metabolic changes in kidney cancer tumors that may one day be targets for therapy.
Insights into the Function of the Main Class of Drug Targets
About thirty percent of all medical drugs such as beta-blockers or antidepressants interact with certain types of cell surface proteins called G protein coupled receptors.
Visualizing a Cancer Drug Target at Atomic Resolution
Using cryo-electron microscopy, researchers were able to view, in atomic detail, the binding of a potential small molecule drug to a key protein in cancer cells.
Honey’s Potential to Save Lives
The healing powers of honey have been known for thousands of years.
3-D Printed Lifelike Liver Tissue for Drug Screening
A team led by engineers at the University of California, San Diego has 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function. The new model could be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling.
Cytoskeleton Crew
Findings confirm sugar's role in helping cancers survive by changing cellular architecture.
Biomarker for Recurring HPV-Linked Oropharyngeal Cancers
A look-back analysis of HPV infection antibodies in patients treated for oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers linked to HPV infection suggests at least one of the antibodies could be useful in identifying those at risk for a recurrence of the cancer, say scientists at the Johns Hopkins University.
Valvena, GSK Sign New R&D Collaboration
Valneva to supply process development services for EB66® -based Influenza vaccines.
Light Signals from Living Cells
Fluorescent protein markers delivered under high pressure.
Cellular 'Relief Valve'
A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key “relief-valve” in cells does its job.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!