Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

University of Dundee First to Install Biacore 4000 SPR System

Published: Wednesday, June 16, 2010
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 16, 2010
Bookmark and Share
The system will be used to focus on developing biophysical fragment based screening methodologies for efficient drug discovery.

The University of Dundee announced that it has become the first facility worldwide to take delivery of Biacore™ 4000. Biacore 4000 is a solution for large-scale, label-free molecular interaction analysis in drug discovery, from early screening to characterization.

The University of Dundee and spin-out company Kinetic Discovery Ltd will be using the system to focus on developing biophysical fragment based screening methodologies for efficient drug discovery.

Dr Iva Navratilova, Independent Investigator, University of Dundee and founder of Kinetic Discovery, commented:  “We are developing biosensor based screening methods that enable us to characterize the kinetics and thermodynamics of molecular interactions. The unprecedented combination of high sample capacity and sensitivity provided by Biacore 4000 means we can now carry out highly accurate screening of our fragment library in only a couple of days, rather than the weeks it would have otherwise taken.”

Dr. Navratilova also plans to use Biacore 4000 to continue her work on developing biosensor SPR methods for screening native membrane proteins such as GPCRs, an important class of drug targets. SPR is used to characterize complex kinetic interactions of GPCRs with their natural ligands or low molecular weight inhibitors. The system is designed for large-scale parallel interaction analyses, with the capability to analyze up to 4800 interactions in 24hrs, ideal for running biophysical screening campaigns on selected compound libraries.

Structural methods used for fragment screening present several technical challenges, including consumption of large amounts of target protein, and a requirement for high sample concentrations due to the low (typically micromolar to millimolar) affinities exhibited by fragments, which leads to solubility/non-specific binding issues. SPR-based strategies can be designed to overcome many of these issues, providing an efficient, informative complement to structural methods. The kinetic information obtained can then be used to support further compound optimization efforts.

“We’re very excited to be the first facility to install a Biacore 4000 instrument”, said Prof. Andrew Hopkins, Chair of Medicinal Informatics and SULSA Research Professor of Translational Biology, University of Dundee, and CEO of Kinetic Discovery: “We believe this reinforces our position as a world leader in the field of SPR based fragment screening, and we look forward to seeing the many benefits the purchase will make to our research efforts.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,100+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Dundee Researchers Seek to Beat "Molecular Obesity"
Researchers from the University of Dundee have come up with a new innovative approach in the quest to reduce failure rates in the drug discovery process.
Thursday, January 26, 2012
Visualising the Problem may help to Improve Antibiotics
Researchers from the Universities of Dundee and Oxford have made a significant breakthrough in understanding how resistance to antibiotics might be overcome, by producing the first ever 3D molecular image of a key drug target and showing how drugs bind to it.
Monday, January 17, 2011
New Programme Leader Appointed to Dundee MRC Unit
MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit recruits Dr Ian Ganley from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
Tuesday, March 02, 2010
Dundee Centre to Focus on Cancer Prevention and Screening
Cancer experts from across a wide range of disciplines at the University of Dundee are to pool their efforts to push forward research into developing effective programmes of prevention and early screening for the disease.
Monday, October 26, 2009
Scientific News
Breast Cancer Drug Hope
A drug for breast cancer that is more effective than existing medicines may be a step closer thanks to new research.
Harnessing Nature’s Vast Array of Venoms for Drug Discovery
Scripps scientists have developed a method for rapidly identifying venoms.
A New Platform for Discovering Antibiotics
Harvard chemists hope to shorten time, difficulty in measuring their effectiveness, potential.
The Need for Speed
Evaluating MALDI-TOF as a high-throughput screening technology for the pharmaceutical industry.
Antarctic Sponge Extract Kills MRSA
New findings may provide opportunity for developing new drugs to fight dangerous bacteria currently highly resistant to treatment.
US-India Collab Finds Molecular Signatures of Severe Malaria
Study may be a significant advancement in understanding the causes of severe malaria.
Novel Way to Prevent Deadly Bacterial Infections
Monash scientists may have found a way to stop deadly bacteria from infecting patients. The discovery could lead to a whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant “superbugs”
Gene Expression Controls Revealed
Researchers have modelled every atom in a key part of the process for switching on genes, revealing a whole new area for potential drug targets.
An Old-New Weapon Against Emerging Chikungunya Virus
Researchers utilize existing drugs to interfere with host factors required for replication of Chikungunya virus.
Using Gene-editing Technology for Faster, Cheaper Antiviral Drug Development
UCLA scientists are working to develop special screening libraries based on a gene-editing technology called CRISPR.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,100+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!