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Omega Diagnostics Group PLC Launches VISITECT® CD4 Point-of-care Test

Published: Wednesday, June 27, 2012
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 27, 2012
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Company has announced the imminent launch of VISITECT® CD4, a point-of-care (POC) disposable test for the detection of CD4 T-cell levels, aimed at reaching HIV-positive patients across the globe.

VISITECT® CD4, developed by the Burnet Institute in Melbourne, Australia, is an affordable POC test that enables CD4 T-cell levels to be determined, quickly and conveniently, even in remote rural areas in resource-poor countries. This easy-to-use, semi-quantitative lateral flow test uses a finger-prick blood sample and produces a straightforward visual result in just 40 minutes, enabling patients to receive life-saving antiretroviral treatment before leaving the clinic. Minimal training is required and no additional instruments are necessary, eliminating the need for sophisticated equipment, expensive reagents and highly trained personnel.

Associate Professor David Anderson, Deputy Director of the Burnet Institute and leader of the team that developed the test, added: “According to UNAIDS, there are 15 million people who should be getting access to antiretroviral therapy but aren’t, just because they can’t get access to an affordable CD4 test in their communities. This test will provide access for even the most remote and disadvantaged patients.”
Andrew Shepherd, Founder and Chief Executive of Omega Diagnostics added: “This test overcomes many of the limitations commonly associated with the traditional technique of flow cytometry, offering a cost-effective means of obtaining immediate CD4 results. Establishing when a patient should commence therapy will improve health and help to reduce transmission of the virus, benefitting the entire population.”

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