Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Flow Technologies in Bioscience Review

Published: Monday, October 29, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, October 29, 2012
Bookmark and Share
The conference highlighted the importance of collaboration between chemists, biologists, material scientists, IT and mechanical engineers, and of course equipment vendors to increase the effectiveness of flow technologies within Bioscience.

Microsaic Systems presented at ‘Flow Technologies in Bioscience’ organised by Labstract and held at the newly opened Stevenage Bioscience Catalyst Innovation centre.

Suki Klair, CEO at Labstract organised a stimulating agenda of speakers with a focus on enabling new applications via flow technologies.

Steve Jordan, Head of R&D, Biotage chaired the event and set the scene by commenting that continuous processing was gaining ground within the pharma industry and welcomed the speakers who ranged from academic thought leaders in flow, including Professor Steve Haswell, University of Hull, to equipment vendors including Microsaic Systems.

Many people are still on the fence about the benefits of flow chemistry, and in some cases it doesn’t make sense to change processes that are working in batch. However, as chemists search for more novel transformations they are forced to look at hazardous transformations such as ozonolysis and diazotisation and this is where flow chemistry can provide significant safety improvements to batch methods. Flow technology is here to stay. It will not replace batch chemistry but it does provide another tool in the chemist’s tool box.

Syrris highlighted a compelling example of this from the BOSS group in Rio de Janeiro where flow through a biocatalyst had increased catalyst efficiency by 10 times, compared to batch. They also mentioned a new electrochemistry module that will be available next year. Electrochemistry is a lost art so a database of reactions will be built up by key users and shared by Syrris on their website.

Matt O’Brien, Keele University talked about his time in the Ley lab, University of Cambridge where gas-liquid reactions have been successfully performed safely in flow with hazardous gases such as ozone using the innovative tube-in-a-tube reactors available from Uniqsis and Cambridge Reactor Design.

Bryan McCullough, Microsaic showed the first example of mass spectrometry being used to monitor a flow reaction which was jointly published with the Ley group, University of Cambridge. Mass spectrometry is not new, but the new miniature MS, the MiD fits in a fumehood, giving chemists access to this useful technique. Both Mettler Toledo, manufacturer of the Flow-IR and Microsaic showed that using on-line monitoring can greatly increase reaction understanding. The Ley group uses these technologies to increase the speed of reaction optimisation and identify new reaction intermediates and pathways.

Chris Selway gave us an insight into what is happening at Cyclofluidic. Their novel synthesis platform allows compounds to be synthesised from a set of pre-loaded monomers, purified, analysed, and then injected into a biological assay. Their algorithm “learns” which compounds are most potent and the computer decides which compound to make next. Each cycle takes 1 hour and over a weekend a candidate compound can be found. This is “closing the loop” of drug discovery, enabled by flow technologies.

Professor Steve Haswell, University of Hull is at the cutting edge of lab-on-a-chip technologies and highlighted the potential use of functionalised microfluidic devices that could be used by police and doctors for point-of-use applications. It was interesting to hear that regulatory bodies are positive about these new, disruptive technologies and actually the barrier-to-entry is the institutions who will resist change, in spite of cost and time savings.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
New Biomarker to Assess Stem Cells Developed
A research team led by scientists from UCL have found a way to assess the viability of 'manufactured' stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The team's discovery offers a new way to fast-track screening methods used in stem cell research.
A Better Model for Parkinson's
Scientists at EPFL solve a longstanding problem with modeling Parkinson’s disease in animals. Using newfound insights, they improve both cell and animal models for the disease, which can propel research and drug development.
Faster Drug Discovery?
Startup develops more cost-effective test for assessing how cells respond to chemicals.
Microalgae Make a Splash in the UK Cosmeceutical Market
Scottish innovators have discovered an anti-viral and anti-inflammatory carbohydrate in microscopic algae (microalgae) which has huge potential to change the cosmetics market.
Mechanism of Tumor Suppressing Gene Uncovered
The most commonly mutated gene in cancer,p53, works to prevent tumor formation by keeping mobile elements in check that otherwise lead to genomic instability, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found.
Experimental Combination Surprises with Anti-HIV Effectiveness
A compound developed to protect the nervous system from HIV surprised researchers by augmenting the effectiveness of an investigational antiretroviral drug beyond anything expected.
Useful Colon Cancer Biomarker Discovered
Biomarker is detectable with simple, inexpensive test.
A New Type of Anticancer Agent
Success in the development of a ?-tubulin specific inhibitor.
Seeing Hope
Gene therapy/drug combo restores some vision in mice with optic nerve injury.
Versatile New Molecule-Building Technique
Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a new and widely applicable technique for building potential drug molecules and other organic compounds.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!