Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

DNA Sequencing Reveals Mucosal Melanoma's Bullseye

Published: Wednesday, June 12, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 12, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Scientists have found a molecular 'bullseye' for a rare form of melanoma, opening up opportunities for new targeted treatment.

DNA sequencing carried out at Cancer Research UK’s Paterson Institute for Cancer Research at the University of Manchester has revealed that the genetic fingerprint of mucosal melanoma is completely different from that of its more common counterpart – cutaneous or melanoma skin cancer.

The study has also revealed for the first time the genetic faults against which new treatments could be targeted for mucosal melanoma patients.

Unlike cutaneous melanoma, for which UV is a well-known risk-factor, little is known about the causes of mucosal melanoma. This means there are no treatments that can target the cancer, leading to starkly contrasting outlooks in these two forms of the disease. Five year survival rates for mucosal melanoma are around 40 per cent, compared to more than 90 per cent for cutaneous. There are around 120-130 cases of mucosal melanoma diagnosed each year in the UK.

Professor Richard Marais, director of the Paterson Institute for Cancer Research and lead author of the research, said: “We’ve seen a completely different gene profile in mucosal melanoma. There’s no classic UV signature, which reinforces our thoughts that this type of cancer isn’t linked to the sun and sunbeds and suggests that these types of melanoma start in different ways.

“We can start to look at these newly discovered genetic faults and develop desperately needed targeted treatments for this type of melanoma. It’s exactly this type of vital research that we and other scientists will be doing at the new Manchester Cancer Research Centre – bringing together a wide range of expertise to revolutionise cancer treatment.”

This research was funded by The Catalyst Club, a pioneering venture that's raising £10 million towards personalised cancer treatment. The club is made up of philanthropists who have invested in a range of projects that will help to bring forward the day when all cancers are cured.

Professor Nic Jones, Cancer Research UK’s chief scientist, said: “In effect, these two sub-types of melanoma are more like different diseases that just happen to affect the same cells. Cutaneous melanoma is strongly linked to UV exposure, number of moles, family history and ethnicity, while mucosal melanoma doesn’t seem to be linked to these factors. But it’s usually more aggressive and more likely to spread to other parts of the body than cutaneous melanoma.

“Research like this is helping us to better understand how this disease works and is the first step towards developing more effective treatments. By recognising the differences between sub-types of melanoma, we will be able to tailor treatment for patients so they have the best chance of beating the disease.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Biggest Database for Cancer Drug Discovery Goes 3D
The world’s largest database for cancer drug discovery has been revolutionised by adding 3D structures of faulty proteins and maps of cancer’s communication networks, according to Cancer Research UK-funded research published in Nucleic Acid Research.
Monday, January 04, 2016
New Companies Join Cancer Research UK Consortium
Three new biomarker companies have been selected to work with the Early Diagnosis Consortium, a collaboration between Cancer Research UK, its commercial arm, Cancer Research Technology and Abcodia.
Thursday, December 11, 2014
CRUK and AstraZeneca Collaborate
Cancer Research UK to collaborate with AstraZeneca in screening for new cancer medicines at the AstraZeneca MRC UK Centre for Lead Discovery.
Friday, November 28, 2014
Scientific News
Platelets are the Pathfinders for Leukocyte Extravasation During Inflammation
Findings from the study could help in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory pathologies.
Benchtop Automation Trends
Gain a better understanding of current interest in and future deployment of benchtop automated systems.
Penn State, TB Alliance, and GSK Partner To Discover New Treatments For TB
A new collaboration between TB Alliance, GSK, and scientists in the Eberly College of Science seeks to find new small molecules that can be used to create antibiotics in the fight against tuberculosis (TB).
Molecular Map Provides Clues To Zinc-Related Diseases
Mapping the molecular structure where medicine goes to work is a crucial step toward drug discovery against deadly diseases.
Genetic Research Can Significantly Improve Drug Development
With drug development costs topping $1.2bn (£850 million) to get a single treatment to the point it can be sold and used in the clinic, could genetic analysis save hundreds of millions of dollars?
New Method Opens Door to Development of Many New Medicines
Findings from TSRI reveal human proteins are better drug targets than previously thought.
Diagnosing Systemic Infections Quickly, Reliably
Team develop rapid and specific diagnostic assay that could help physicians decide within an hour whether a patient has a systemic infection and should be hospitalized for aggressive intervention therapy.
What Makes a Good Scientist?
It’s the journey, not just the destination that counts as a scientist when conducting research.
Blood Test That Detects Early Alzheimer’s Disease
A research team, led by Dr. Robert Nagele from Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and Durin Technologies, Inc., has announced the development of a blood test that leverages the body’s immune response system to detect an early stage of Alzheimer’s disease – referred to as the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage – with unparalleled accuracy.
A New Approach to Chemical Synthesis
Communesins, originally found in fungus, could hold potential as cancer drugs.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!