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EASYstrainer Cell Sieve Simplifies Aseptic Work

Published: Thursday, July 25, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, July 25, 2013
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Greiner Bio-One, a technology partner for the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industry, has developed EASYstrainer, a cell sieve for the filtration of cell suspensions.

The sieve is ideal for preparing single cells for flow cytometry and to separate individual cells after organ digestion as part of the primary cell extraction process.

When filtering cell suspensions it is particularly important that the sterile filter material is not contaminated through accidental contact. That’s why Greiner Bio-One has designed EASYstrainer with a circumferential mantle surface and handle fitted directly on the sieve. Handling is also made easier by the sieve’s structured surface. In addition to this, the blister packaging ensures reliable, aseptic removal of sieves from the pack.

The special EASYstrainer design features a venting slot between the collection tube and the attached cell sieve. Air in the tube can escape through this slot during filtration. Filtration is quick and overflow is avoided. EASYstrainer also does not require filtration material at the side. This special property prevents the accumulation of filtration liquid between the sieve and tube and thus the associated risk of contamination.

EASYstrainer is suitable for all standard 50 ml tubes and is available in mesh widths 40 µl (green), 70 µl (blue) and 100 µl (yellow).

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