Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biomolecular Screening
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Genalyte and Barbara Davis Diabetes Center Collaborate

Published: Friday, August 16, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, August 16, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Genalyte launches multiplexed biomarker panel that measures seven autoantigens associated with the development of T1D.

Genalyte, Inc. has announced the launch of its Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) antigen panel that runs on the Maverick™ Detection System.

The Genalyte T1D antigen panel is the first multiplexed assay that measures seven autoantibodies associated with the destruction of pancreatic islet cells seen in type 1 diabetes.

In a related development, Genalyte reported that it is collaborating with the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes (BDC) at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to further develop and test multiplexed antigen panels for the early detection of T1D.

The Genalyte T1D antigen panel was developed as part of the first phase of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant awarded to Genalyte to develop multiplexed assays for the early detection and monitoring of type 1 diabetes.

The $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases also provides support for expansion of the approach to allow autoantibody response profiling by multiple criteria, which is expected to enhance the ability of researchers and clinicians to detect and monitor the development of the disease.

Martin Gleeson, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer of Genalyte, noted, “The pioneering work of Drs. George Eisenbarth and Liping Yu at BDC established assays for the measurement of islet autoantibodies. These rogue elements of the immune system eventually destroy the pancreatic islet cells that produce insulin. The unique capabilities of our Maverick detection platform have the potential to provide researchers and clinicians with tools to detect and track this process from an early stage, when interventions to interrupt the disease process may be feasible.”

An estimated three million individuals in the U.S. have T1D, an autoimmune disorder that leads to life-long dependence on insulin injections.

New disease-modifying therapies may have the potential to reduce or stop the destruction of islet cells in patients at risk of developing T1D.

The availability of tools to identify these patients early in the disease process would facilitate the development and use of these preventative therapies.

“We are pleased to offer our innovative T1D antigen panel to diabetes researchers worldwide at the same time that we are working with Dr. Liping Yu and his lab at the Barbara Davis Diabetes Center to expand the utility of the approach,” added Dr. Gleeson. “BDC is a long-time leader in the quest to develop curative therapies for type 1 diabetes, and we are delighted to collaborate with them to develop the tools that may help make this dream a reality.”

The Genalyte T1D antigen panel requires only a 2 to 5 μL serum or plasma sample and provides results in less than 15 minutes, without the use of dyes, fluorescent probes or radioactive labels.

The T1D panel measures autoantibodies to insulin, proinsulin, GAD 65, GAD 67, IA-2 (PTPRN, ICA512), phogrin (PTPRN2, IA-2ß) and ZnT8 (SLC30A8). For more information, visit http://genalyte.com/maverick-type-1-diabetes-t1d-assay-kit/.

Other commercially available tests for the Maverick Detection System include MT-ADA, ENA 4, ENA 6 and ANA 14 assay kits.

Additionally, Genalyte offers researchers a Custom Spotting Service that loads proteins supplied by customers, such as antibodies, peptides, biomarkers, cytokines and antigens, on to standard-format Genalyte chips that are ready to be run on the Maverick System.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Charting Kidney Cancer Metabolism
Changes in cell metabolism are increasingly recognized as an important way tumors develop and progress, yet these changes are hard to measure and interpret. A new tool designed by MSK scientists allows users to identify metabolic changes in kidney cancer tumors that may one day be targets for therapy.
Insights into the Function of the Main Class of Drug Targets
About thirty percent of all medical drugs such as beta-blockers or antidepressants interact with certain types of cell surface proteins called G protein coupled receptors.
Visualizing a Cancer Drug Target at Atomic Resolution
Using cryo-electron microscopy, researchers were able to view, in atomic detail, the binding of a potential small molecule drug to a key protein in cancer cells.
Honey’s Potential to Save Lives
The healing powers of honey have been known for thousands of years.
3-D Printed Lifelike Liver Tissue for Drug Screening
A team led by engineers at the University of California, San Diego has 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function. The new model could be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling.
Cytoskeleton Crew
Findings confirm sugar's role in helping cancers survive by changing cellular architecture.
Biomarker for Recurring HPV-Linked Oropharyngeal Cancers
A look-back analysis of HPV infection antibodies in patients treated for oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers linked to HPV infection suggests at least one of the antibodies could be useful in identifying those at risk for a recurrence of the cancer, say scientists at the Johns Hopkins University.
Valvena, GSK Sign New R&D Collaboration
Valneva to supply process development services for EB66® -based Influenza vaccines.
Light Signals from Living Cells
Fluorescent protein markers delivered under high pressure.
Cellular 'Relief Valve'
A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key “relief-valve” in cells does its job.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!