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AMSBIO & Sanguine Biosciences Announce Distribution Agreement

Published: Friday, August 23, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, August 23, 2013
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Agreement to distribute and support AMSBIO’s products and services throughout Europe.

AMSBIO has announced that it has reached agreement with Sanguine BioSciences, a biotechnology company enabling personalized medicine research, to distribute and support its products and services throughout Europe.

Commenting on the new agreement Phillip Pridham-Field of AMSBIO said "Sanguine's approach to biospecimen collection and their high patient retention allow researchers to collect the data they need with better turnaround time and with the potential for longitudinal studies. We believe their extensive biospecimen library will be an excellent addition to our current product offerings for researchers in life sciences."

Sanguine collects and de-identifies biospecimen, medical history and other data from patients diagnosed with severe and chronic diseases for use in biomarker research.

Researchers traditionally obtain biospecimen through hospitals, but this process often proves inefficient as the focus for physicians and staff is on diagnosis and treatment, not facilitating research efforts.

By connecting directly with patients, Sanguine is able to meet the needs of researchers and offer timely turnaround of biospecimen and medical data with diverse ranges for age, race, disease state, gender and treatments underway.

The patient engagement tactics used by the company have led to a 95 percent retention rate, which also allow for follow-up draws for longitudinal studies.

"There is no denying that personalized medicine has become a significant area of interest for drug discovery, but there exists a gap between researchers who require biospecimen respective medical data, and patients who want to be a part of research efforts," said Brian Neman, founder and chief executive officer of Sanguine.

Neman continued, "We have engaged hundreds of patient subjects, and built a library of specimen and data that can effectively bridge this gap. We look forward to partnering with AMSBIO to make this service accessible to researchers around the world working in different therapeutic areas."

Sanguine is able to meet, review disclosures and collect blood samples in a patient's home with its own phlebotomists in multiple major U.S. cities. Patients are also able to track how their de-identified biospecimen and data are used through the donor web-portal.

The company is able to collect and process blood from patients with any disease and has already built large libraries in multiple chronic and severe conditions, including Huntington's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and others.

In order to maintain appropriate confidentiality, all samples are de-identified immediately upon collection. Sanguine maintains and reviews internal ethical guidelines for the procedures under high scrutiny from an independent review board.


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