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Cellectricon Launches New Module for Physiological Ion Channel Research

Published: Tuesday, November 12, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, November 12, 2013
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Dynaflow® Resolve Temperature Control combines controlled solution exchange with precise temperature regulation.

Cellectricon has launched the Dynaflow® Resolve Temperature Control system at Neuroscience 2013 (San Diego), booth #933.

Cellectricon’s Dynaflow Resolve automated perfusion system uses microfluidics for rapid and efficient solution exchange experiments, enabling the measurement of ion channel current regardless of cell type or compound.

The new Temperature Control add-on module has been specifically developed to enable high performance patch clamp experiments at physiological temperatures, from room temperature up to 45 °C.

Temperature control during ion channel research is particularly important when investigating ion channel kinetics and toxicity screening applications, and now Cellectricon’s Dynaflow Resolve Temperature Control ensures patch clamp experiments can be performed with unsurpassed speed, control and flexibility at these elevated temperatures for true physiological insight.

Developed in response to customer demand, the Dynaflow Resolve Temperature Control guarantees precise, definable temperature control and complete stability, even for hour-long experiments.

Without any risk of temperature fluctuations following solution switch, scientists can be assured of reliable, reproducible results in constant physiological conditions.

Cellectricon will be launching the add-on at Neuroscience 2013, booth #933, and invites interested researchers and scientists to drop by the booth with any questions.

At the event, Cellectricon will also present a poster detailing the technology and application of the Dynaflow Resolve system for fast activating ion channels.

The poster presentation entitled ‘A method for patch-clamp recordings of fast-acting ion channels in rat dorsal root ganglion cells’ takes place at 11-12pm, Tuesday 12th November.

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