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New XFe96 Spheroid Microplate from Seahorse Bioscience

Published: Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, April 24, 2014
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The microplate enables functional, metabolic measurement of in vitro tumor spheroids.

This unique 96-well plate features geometry that enables functional, metabolic measurements of individual spheroids for the study of three-dimensional cell culture, which more closely mimics in vivo conditions. Of particular importance for tumor studies, the real-time metabolism of multicellular spheroids can now be analyzed and used for evaluating the metabolic response to therapeutic agents.

“Our customers indicated a need for three-dimensional assay capability but they did not have a measurement tool until now,” explains Brian P. Dranka, Ph.D., manager of biology for Seahorse Bioscience. “Using the XFe96 Spheroid Microplate and the XFe96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, scientists can now obtain sensitive and reproducible data from individual spheroids with high specificity.”

The XFe96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer simultaneously measures the two major energy-producing pathways within the cell ¬¬– mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis – in a microplate, in real time. The XFe96 Analyzer and Stress Test Kits standardize the measurement of mitochondrial function and glycolysis. The addition of the XFe96 Spheroid Microplate further advances the study of cell metabolism, helping scientists better understand the connection of physiological traits of cells with genomic and proteomic data. This knowledge will generate new insights into cell metabolism and mitochondrial function, leading to a greater understanding and new treatments of diseases including cancer.

The XFe96 Spheroid FluxPak contains six cartridges, six microplates and calibrant. The new plates will be ready for orders and shipment at the beginning of May.

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