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  Events - December 2012

Stem Cells: A Pathway Through the Maze

05 Dec 2012 - 07 Dec 2012 - University of Oxford

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bloodvessel.gifFew topics have captured the imagination of the general public quite as dramatically as stem cells, both for the potential they offer regenerative medicine and the ethical sensitivities they create.

This course is intended to dispel the myths behind stem cell biology and introduce delegates to the science behind the headlines, the pitfalls as well as the promises.

Although the course will assume basic knowledge of the biomedical sciences, no previous understanding of stem cell biology will be required.

The course will begin by introducing key concepts in the field which will form the basis for exploring the properties of selected populations of adult and embryonic stem cells.

Later sessions will be devoted to applied topics that are essential to the therapeutic application of stem cell biology before focussing on ethical and regulatory issues and surveying the landscape for patenting and marketing of stem cell therapies.

The taught component of the course will draw on the varied expertise available within the University of Oxford, with contributions from outside experts, where appropriate.

This course is led by Dr Paul Fairchild, Co-Director, Oxford Stem Cell Institute, Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford.

Image:Blood vessel in GFAP-driven thymidine kinase brain by Jason Snyder | CC BY 3.0

Further information
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