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  Events - April 2013


Immunology: A Pathway Through the Maze

30 Apr 2013 - 01 May 2013 - University of Oxford



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Immunology is a rapidly developing subject with wide-ranging implications for the pharmaceutical, healthcare and biotechnology industries.

Common questions include, for example: How does the immune system defend the body against infection? What goes wrong when autoimmunity develops? How can undesirable responses be controlled?

Team leaders, R&D directors, and researchers at the bench all need to understand the latest developments in immunology and their implications for drug discovery and development as well as disease treatment. An understanding of the fundamental features of the immune system is essential not only for those who work in areas directly related to infection and immunity, but also for those working in the development of biopharmaceuticals, vaccines and antibody therapy, who wish to exploit the technological advances that have resulted from our increased insight into how the system functions.

As well as offering a path through the immunology maze, the course will emphasize the R&D opportunities for therapeutic intervention that arise from recent advances in immunology, for example the use of therapeutic antibodies and recombinant molecules as potential drug treatments. After the introductory session, each lecture will begin by covering the basic concepts of a particular area of immunology; these will then be developed in such a way that participants are rapidly brought an understanding of the most recent findings.

Oxford is a leading centre in the creative development and application of the theory and techniques of immunology in collaboration with industry. The presenters are leading scientists in their fields and use these techniques in their day-to-day research. They work in the Nuffield Department of Surgery at the University of Oxford.



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