Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Different Infective Forms Trigger Distinct Immune Response in Experimental Chagas Disease

Published: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Last Updated: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Bookmark and Share
The main goal of the current work was to investigate kinetically alterations in parasitemia and leukocytes of the peripheral blood, cardiac inflammation and the cytokine profile of T-cell subsets in the spleen during the acute-phase of experimental infection by MT forms.

Abstract
Although metacyclic and blood trypomastigotes are completely functional in relation to parasite-host interaction and/or target cell invasion, they differ in the molecules present on the surface. Thus, aspects related to the variability that the forms of T. cruzi interacts with host cells may lead to fundamental implications on the immune response against this parasite and, consequently, the clinical evolution of Chagas disease. We have shown that BT infected mice presented higher levels of parasitemia during all the acute phase of infection. Moreover, the infection with either MT or BT forms resulted in increased levels of total leukocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes, specifically later for MT and earlier for BT. The infection with BT forms presented earlier production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-a and later of IFN-c by both T cells subpopulations. This event was accompanied by an early cardiac inflammation with an exacerbation of this process at the end of the acute phase. On the other hand, infection with MT forms result in an early production of IFN-c, with subsequent control in the production of this cytokine by IL-10, which provided to these animals an immunomodulatory profile in the end of the acute phase. These results are in agreement with what was found for cardiac inflammation where animals infected with MT forms showed intense cardiac inflammation later at infection, with a decrease in the same at the end of this phase. In summary, our findings emphasize the importance of taking into account the inoculums source of T. cruzi, since vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase that may influence relevant biological aspects of chronic Chagas disease.

This iarticle is published online in PLoS ONE and is free to access.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,600+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Separation of mAbs Molecular Variants by Analytical HIC-HPLC
HIC-HPLC is a less widely used analytical technique compared with standard methods for separating variants based on size, charge or electrophoretic mobility.
Thursday, June 05, 2014
Constrained Evolution Drives Limited Influenza Diversity
Looking at the reasons behind the surprisingly low rate of H3N2 influenza A virus evolution.
Thursday, May 24, 2012
Algae-Produced Surface Protein Elicits Antibodies That Inhibit Malaria Transmission
In this study, scientists tested whether algal chloroplasts can produce malaria transmission blocking vaccine candidates, Plasmodium falciparum surface protein 25 (Pfs25) and 28 (Pfs28).
Thursday, May 24, 2012
Functional Metabolomics Reveals Novel Active Products in the DHA Metabolome
In this review, researchers from Harvard Medical School provide an update and overview of functional metabolomics that identified a new bioactive metabolome of docosahexaenoic acid.
Monday, May 14, 2012
The Immune Response to Melanoma is Limited by Thymic Selection of Self-Antigens
This study emphasizes the importance of investigating thymic expression of self-antigens prior to their inclusion in vaccination and immunotherapy strategies.
Wednesday, April 18, 2012
Quantitative Proteomics Reveals that only a Subset of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Contributes to the Phagosome
Early proteomics studies indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) might contribute to phagosome genesis. This article provides compelling evidence of ER recruitment to phagosome by biochemical and morphological approaches.
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
M cell Targeting by a Claudin 4 Targeting Peptide Can Enhance Mucosal IgA Responses
This study tests the recently developed Claudin 4 targeting peptide in it's ability to deliver vaccines via the uptake of nanoparticles through nasal M cells.
Thursday, March 22, 2012
Profiling of the BRCA1 Transcriptome Through Microarray and ChIP-chip Analysis
Data from the study suggests a model, whereby BRCA1 is present on defined promoters as part of an inactive complex poised to respond to various genotoxic stimuli.
Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Towards Protein Crystallization as a Process Step in Downstream Processing of Therapeutic Antibodies: Screening and Optimization at Microbatch Scale
Researchers from Biberach University of Applied Sciences demonstrate that crystallization has the potential to be included in downstream processing as a low-cost purification or formulation step.
Monday, October 17, 2011
High-Efficiency Screening of Monoclonal Antibodies for Membrane Protein Crystallography
Researchers from Brandeis University present an optimized process for efficient screening from immunization to final validation of monoclonal antibody for membrane protein crystallography.
Friday, September 23, 2011
NMR, Biophysical and Biochemical Studies Reveal the Minimal Calmodulin-Binding Domain of the HIV-1 Matrix Protein
Research from the University of Alabama may assist in the identification of the functional role of Calmodulin-Gag interactions in the HIV replication cycle.
Thursday, September 01, 2011
Profiling the Humoral Immune Response of Acute and Chronic Q Fever by Protein Microarray
To assess the antibody repertoire of acute and chronic Q fever patients researchers from the University of California have constructed a protein microarray containing the causative agent of Q fever.
Wednesday, August 31, 2011
Effects of Different Centrifugation Conditions on Clinical Chemistry and Immunology Test Results
Centrifugation time has a considerable impact on turn-around-time. This article studies the effect of centrifugation time of heparinized blood samples on clinical chemistry and immunology.
Tuesday, August 09, 2011
Cell Chip Array for Microfluidic Proteomics Enabling Rapid in situ Assessment of Intracellular Protein Phosphorylation
This article, published in Biomicrofluidics, discusses the ability to perform fluorescent immunocytochemistry, following cell fixation, using a microfluidic array of primary, nonadherent, single CD34+ stem cells.
Wednesday, June 22, 2011
Revisiting the Technical Validation of Tumour Biomarker Assays: How to Open a Pandora's Box
This article discusses the challenges for the technical validation of immunohistochemical and gene expression assays to detect tumour biomarkers and provides suggestions of pragmatic solutions to address these challenges.
Tuesday, May 03, 2011
Scientific News
Platelets are the Pathfinders for Leukocyte Extravasation During Inflammation
Findings from the study could help in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory pathologies.
Dengue Virus Exposure May Amplify Zika Infection
Researchers at Imperial College London have found that the previous exposure to the dengue virus may increase the potency of Zika infection.
Itchy Inflammation Of Mosquito Bites Helps Viruses Replicate
The itchy swelling that appears at the site of a mosquito bite isn't just an irritating nuisance - it also makes viral infections spread by the insects far worse, new research has found.
Guided Chemotherapy Missiles
Latching chemotherapy drugs onto proteins that seek out tumors could provide a new way of treating tumors in the brain or with limited blood supply that are hard to reach with traditional chemotherapy.
Revealing T-Cells in Action
Salk scientists show how T-cell receptors reposition during an immune response, revealing more on how the immune system is regulated.
Impact of Antibiotic Treatment on the Infant Gut Microbiome
Study shows that antibiotic treatment reduces stability and diversity of microbial population in the first three years of life.
Viruses Hack Their Host's Genome with CRISPR
A virus that infects major freshwater bacteria appears to use stolen bits of immune system DNA to highjack their hosts’ immune response.
Reclaiming The Immune System's Assault On Tumors
EPFL study shows a way to reclaim corrupted immune cells.
What Makes a Good Scientist?
It’s the journey, not just the destination that counts as a scientist when conducting research.
Blood Test That Detects Early Alzheimer’s Disease
A research team, led by Dr. Robert Nagele from Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and Durin Technologies, Inc., has announced the development of a blood test that leverages the body’s immune response system to detect an early stage of Alzheimer’s disease – referred to as the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage – with unparalleled accuracy.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,600+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!