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Immunovative, Inc. Announces the Appointment of Members to the Scientific Advisory Board

Published: Tuesday, September 04, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, September 04, 2012
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The SAB serves as a Committee to the ITL Board of Directors and serves the joint interests of IMUN and ITL. Dr. Laurence Rulleau, PhD, a member of the IMUN Business Advisory Board, will represent IMUN at ITL SAB meetings.

Joining Dr. Rulleau and Dr. Katsanis, are five world-renowned medical scientists who bring expertise in key areas that will be invaluable in transitioning ITL from the current clinical development phase to commercialization.

The members of the Scientific Advisory Board are:

•    Lawrence Fong, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Fong is a specialist in urologic oncology and an expert in tumor immunology and developing cancer vaccines.

•    Diego Martin, MD, PhD, Professor of Radiology and Head of the Department of Medical Imaging at the University of Arizona. Dr. Martin is an internationally recognized leader in MRI technology for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease.

•    Frank Ondrey, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of the Molecular Oncology Program at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Ondrey is a head and neck cancer surgeon board certified in otolaryngology.

•    Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology, Surgical Oncology and Director of the Cell and Gene Therapy Core Facility at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Ribas is a specialist in tumor immunology and cancer vaccine development and clinical trials in immunotherapy.

•    Theresa Whiteside, PhD, Professor of Pathology, Immunology and Otolaryngology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Whiteside serves as Laboratory Director of Immunologic Monitoring and Cellular Products Laboratory at University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.

"We are very pleased to bring together these key thought leaders to establish the Immunovative Therapies, Ltd. Scientific Advisory Board," stated Dr. Emmanuel Katsanis, Immunovative's Chief Medical Officer. "Their deep insight into immunological mechanisms of cancer, the design, analysis, imaging, pathological and immunological monitoring of clinical trials will be instrumental in advancing and expanding our therapeutic programs."

Dr. Michael Har-Noy, Founder and CEO of Immunovative Therapies, stated: "We are honored and humbled that our technology is able to attract the interest and direct participation of these world class scientists and physicians on our SAB. We anticipate an active SAB and look forward to working closely with these experts in developing the strategies that will enable us to advance our immunotherapies and understand how they are working and how to improve them in order to provide patients with advanced cancer with alternatives to toxic treatment regimens. "

"During the past year, ITL has made important advances in the development of cell-based immunotherapy products," said Seth Shaw, CEO and Chairman of IMUN. "Preparations are now almost completed for launch of a randomized, controlled, Phase II/III clinical of the lead AlloStim™ product in advanced stages of metastatic breast cancer and for launch of a randomized Phase I/II clinical trial of AlloVax™ in advanced stages of Head and Neck cancer. The appointment of the SAB will be invaluable in overseeing the scientific analysis of data from these trials and in developing new products and improvements. The SAB will also assist in supporting our strategy to collaborate with academic medical centers to develop additional indications of AlloStim™ and AlloVax™ and in seeking and evaluating potential licensing partners."

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