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Genetimes Technology Named as Nanoink’s New Distributor in China

Published: Thursday, January 24, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 24, 2013
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Will distribute NanoInk's NLP 2000 System and DPN 5000 System.

NanoInk’s NanoFabrication Systems Division has announced that it has reached a non-exclusive agreement with Genetimes Technology Inc. to serve as its distributor in China.

Genetimes will distribute NanoInk's desktop nanofabrication equipment, including the NLP 2000 System and the DPN 5000 System, which have a wide range of applications ranging from nanoarray-based protein analysis to cell biology research.

Genetimes is a renowned life science equipment and consumable distributor and is dedicated to developing the nanobiotechnology market in China.

“With branch offices located in 12 cities, Genetimes has already established a strong relationship with NanoInk's target customers in the life science market. Its sales and technical teams have the in-depth knowledge required to understand life science applications, and they have proven expertise in selling technically-sophisticated equipment into that space. With these strengths, Genetimes is the ideal partner for driving sales of NanoInk's unique nanofabrication platforms for use in life science and bioengineering applications,” said Oliver Yeh, General Manager, NanoInk's NanoFabrication Systems Division, Asia-Pacific region.

Yeh continued, “We look forward to a close and successful long-term partnership with Genetimes as we expand our reach in China by promoting the unique capabilities and benefits of innovated NanoFabrication Systems from NanoInk.”

“We are delighted to be appointed as a distributor for NanoInk's products in China’s life science markets,” said Mr. Yuan Zhao, Senior Vice President, Marketing and International Operations at Genetimes Technology.

Mr. Zhao continued, “NanoInk's product lines are complementary to our current product portfolio and are attractive to cell biology markets. We look forward to working with the NanoInk team.”

NanoInk's NanoFabrication Systems Division brings sophisticated nanofabrication to the laboratory in an easy to use and affordable platform.

NanoInk's NLP 2000 System is a desktop nanolithography instrument that allows researchers to rapidly design and create custom engineered and functionalized surfaces by using Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN®) to transfer minute amounts of materials over a large, environmentally controlled work area.

With the ability to create custom patterns of nano- to microscale features in under an hour, the NLP 2000 System is valuable for protein and biomolecular patterning, microstructure and biosensor functionalization, cell biology and polymer printing applications.

The DPN 5000 System is a full-featured, dedicated instrument for versatile nanopatterning of a variety of materials with nanoscale accuracy and precision. With its user-friendly interface, it is possible to easily design complex patterns while also precisely controlling tip movements during the writing process.

The DPN 5000 System is the ideal platform for nanofabrication, nanomaterials and biomaterials applications that exhibit nanoscale printing, imaging and registration requirements.


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