Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

DecImmune Therapeutics Secures $2.25 Million in Development Funding

Published: Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Bookmark and Share
New investment from Broadview Ventures along with existing investors HealthCare Ventures and Astellas Venture Management.

DecImmune Therapeutics announced that it has completed a $2.25 million equity financing. The financing is from a new investor Broadview Ventures, along with existing investors Astellas Venture Management and HealthCare Ventures. The new funds will enable rapid advancement toward IND filing for the company’s proprietary antibody therapeutic to reduce tissue damage and improve ventricular function associated with myocardial infarction. Regaining full function after a heart attack can be complicated by irreversible tissue damage and scar formation that leads to a significant loss in cardiac pumping efficiency. In a range of experimental models the company has shown it is possible to reduce damage to heart tissue by using their proprietary therapeutic antibody. In these models the reduction in damage to heart tissue results in pumping efficiency returning to normal levels. DecImmune is also investigating this targeted approach to reduce tissue damage for a range of other acute and chronic post-injury settings.

The funding announced today will support preclinical development of DecImmune’s therapeutic program targeting heart failure as an adjunct to current standards of care. Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in the United States, responsible for 1.2 million deaths per year.

“Our lead monoclonal antibody has shown robust activity in a range of models of myocardial infarct,” said Dr. Walter Newman, Chief Scientific Officer of DecImmune. “This funding sets the stage for completion of late stage preclinical studies as we advance toward IND filing.”

“Broadview Ventures’ core expertise lies in identifying and supporting the most promising cardiovascular and stroke related therapies,” said Christopher Colecchi, Managing Director of Broadview Ventures. “We believe that DecImmune’s novel therapeutic approach could have a major impact on the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Developing a More Precise Seasonal Flu Vaccine
During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world’s vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective.
Fighting Cancer with Borrowed Immunity
A new step in cancer immunotherapy: researchers from the Netherlands Cancer Institute and University of Oslo/Oslo University Hospital show that even if one's own immune cells cannot recognize and fight their tumors, someone else's immune cells might.
Loss Of Y Chromosome Increases Risk Of Alzheimer’s
Men with blood cells that do not carry the Y chromosome are at greater risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This is in addition to an increased risk of death from other causes, including many cancers. These new findings by researchers at Uppsala University could lead to a simple test to identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Immune Cells Remember Their First Meal
Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response – a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases.
"Sunscreen" Gene May Guard Against Melanoma
USC-led study reveals that melanoma patients with deficient or mutant copies of the gene are less protected from harmful ultraviolet rays.
Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play Role in Tumor Growth
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have reported a new mechanism that helps cancer cells engage myeloid-derived suppressor cells.
Drug Might Help Treat Sepsis
A DNA enzyme called Top1 plays a key role in turning on genes that cause inflammation in mouse and human cells in response to pathogens. A drug blocking this enzyme rescued mice from lethal inflammatory responses, suggesting a potential treatment for sepsis.
Large-scale HIV Vaccine Trial to Launch in South Africa
NIH-funded study will test safety, efficacy of vaccine regimen.
Immune System Implicated in Gastroschisis
UCSF researchers show that the immune system is implicated in gastroschisis. The findings could lead to improved treatments for the belly birth defect.
Hay Fever's Hidden Supporting Substances
TUM study finds that non-allergenic substances in pollen heighten the immune response.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!