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Research in the News: Arming the Immune System to Fight Myeloma

Published: Tuesday, March 05, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, March 05, 2013
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The study appears in the journal Blood.

Yale researchers led by Madhav Dhodapkar, professor of hematology and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine, showed how combining drugs that regulate the natural killer cells of the immune system with dendritic cells loaded with anti-tumor drugs may prevent the asymptomatic precursor state of multiple myeloma from progressing to a full blown case of the disease.


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