Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Yale Researchers Trick Bacteria to Deliver a Safer Vaccine

Published: Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Yale researchers have developed a new trick, using bacteria’s own cellular mistakes to deliver a safe vaccine.

The findings suggest new ways to create novel vaccines that effectively combat disease but can be tolerated by children, the elderly, and the immune-compromised who might be harmed by live vaccines.

“We have managed to assemble a functional protein-injection machine within bacterial mini-cells, and the amazing thing is that it works,” said Jorge Galan, senior author of the paper and the Lucille P. Markey Professor of Microbial Pathogenesis and chair of the Section of Microbial Pathogenesis at Yale.

Galan’s team has assembled the molecular machine used by Salmonella to cause food poisoning or typhoid fever. Scientists have been successful in modifying this protein injection machine to trigger a protective immune response against a variety of infectious diseases. However, it has been necessary to use modified or virulence-attenuated bacteria that carry this machine.

The new trick exploits a mutation that causes bacteria to create “mini-cells” when they improperly divide. Mini-cells contain no DNA and, therefore, are not pathogenic and extremely safe. Galan’s team was able to assemble the protein-injection machines within these bacterial cells, which when administered to mice, deliver antigens that trigger an immune response without causing an infection.

The system could be used to combat cancer as well as a wide variety of infectious diseases, Galan said.

Heather A. Carleton is lead author of the paper. Other Yale authors include Maria Lara-Tejero and Xiaoyun Liu.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Reduced Immune Response Causes Flu Deaths in Older Adults
Yale study suggests that immune response to flu causes death in older people, not the virus.
Friday, April 22, 2016
CNS Inflammation: A Pathway and Possible Drug Target
Scientists have long known that the central nervous system (CNS) has a remarkable ability to limit excessive inflammation in the presence of antigens or injury, but how it works has been unclear.
Tuesday, April 12, 2016
Chaos, Hope, And The Lupus Butterfly Theory
The lupus butterfly theory suggests that antibodies that attack DNA in lupus may be sources of both chaos and hope.
Wednesday, April 06, 2016
Life-Extending Hormone Bolsters Immunity
A hormone that extends lifespan in mice by 40% is produced by specialized cells in the thymus gland, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers.
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
Creating More Potent Vaccines
Yale researchers uncovered a new role for a type of immune cell, known as regulatory T cells, in promoting long-term immunity.
Wednesday, July 08, 2015
Researchers Solve Multiple Sclerosis Puzzle
Yale study shows the role that T cells play in MS.
Monday, May 18, 2015
New Tool To Explore Mysteries Of The Immune System
Yale scientists use CyTOF to study a range of conditions.
Monday, April 20, 2015
Cold Virus Replicates Better At Cooler Temperatures
Study shows that the immune response to rhinovirus is influenced by temperature.
Tuesday, January 06, 2015
New Class of Synthetic Molecules Mimics Antibodies
A Yale University lab has crafted the first synthetic molecules that have both the targeting and response functions of antibodies.
Wednesday, December 24, 2014
Protein Predicts Response To New Immunotherapy Drug
Trial shows that response to treatment may be predicted by the presence of an immune-suppressing protein in non-cancerous immune cells.
Friday, November 28, 2014
Immune System Surprise Hints at New Strategy for Fighting HIV
Surprising twist may open a new avenue in the fight.
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Immune Cells get Cancer-Fighting Boost From Nanomaterials
Yale researchers used bundled carbon nanotubes to incubate cytotoxic T cells.
Monday, August 18, 2014
Commonly Used Drugs May Not Be Effective Against Autoimmune Illness
The study appears in the Cell Press journal Immunity.
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Yale Team Implants Human Innate Immune Cells in Mice
Groundbreaking study has reproduced human immune function at a level not seen previously.
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Lung Disease and Melanoma: a Common Molecular Mechanism?
Researchers have solved a biological mystery about the common genesis of many serious diseases such as asthma and metastatic melanoma.
Monday, September 02, 2013
Scientific News
Gut Bacteria Older than Human Species
Some bacteria have lived in the human gut since before we were human, suggesting evolution could have a larger role inhuman bacterial makeup.
Evidence of Mosquito Transmitting Zika
A direct link between the Yellow fever mosquito and Zika transmission has been found following investigation into selective mosquito control.
Antibody-Based Drug for Multiple Sclerosis
New antibody-based drug paves the way for new strategies for controlling and treating multiple sclerosis.
Three-Drug Combinations Counter Antibiotic Resistance
Research shows that combinations of three different antibiotics can treat resistant bacteria, even if they are ineffective independently.
Mapping Zika’s Routes to Developing Fetus
UC researchers show how Zika virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus, and also identified a drug that could stop it.
Treating HIV with Cancer-Fighting Gene Shows Promise
A type of gene immunotherapy that has shown promising results against cancer could also be used against HIV.
Protein Teams Activate T-Cells
Caltech researchers have discovered T-cell genetic switching is controlled by four proteins acting in a multi-tiered fashion.
'Antigen-Presenting Cell' Defends Against Cancer
Through advanced imaging, researchers have identified cells that encourages increases in immune system cancer defences.
Zika Epidemic Likely to End Within Three Years
A team of scientists has predicted that the current Zika epidemic is likely to end within three years because there will be too few people left to infect.
Go-Between Immune Cell is Key to Priming the Body’s Fight Against Cancer
‘Antigen-presenting cell’ activates T cells by alerting them to the presence of tumors.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!