Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

In Managing Inflammation, Controlling White Blood Cell Flow may be Key

Published: Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, March 27, 2013
Bookmark and Share
New research by sets the stage for improved management of acute tissue inflammation by advancing current understanding of inflammatory processes.

To exit blood vessels and reach injured tissue, white blood cells must pass through a series of natural barriers. Some aspects of blood vessel architecture facilitate white cell migration to a greater degree than others, a means of self-regulation: Excessive migration can result in extreme inflammation, turning otherwise helpful white cells into agents of disease.

Research by Yale bioengineers reported March 26 in the journal PLOS ONE sheds new light on the roles of specific layers of vasculature, suggesting ways of controlling inflammation.

“By understanding the regulatory mechanisms within the vascular wall, we hope we can identify potential treatments to ensure or restore the balance between protection and destruction of tissues,” said Anjelica L. Gonzalez, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Yale and principal investigator of the research.

The work focuses in particular on the function of a less permeable (and little studied, researchers said) layer of cells within the blood vessel wall known as the pericyte layer.

Using a composite microvascular model that incorporates both the inner and outer layers of blood vessels, Gonzalez and colleagues showed that the outer pericyte layer helps restrict the number of exiting white blood cells. This helps prevent excessive inflammation, they said. In contrast, the inner (endothelial) layer primes white blood cells for passage through the pericyte layer by transforming them into a more versatile cell subpopulation. A malfunctioning pericyte layer could be responsible for excessive inflammation, they said.

“The results suggest that any disease or disorder that can be termed inflammatory — including wound healing, tissue fibrosis and cancer metastasis — may be exacerbated because of a poor pericyte barrier,” said Gonzalez. “White blood cell-mediated inflammation, in particular, is related to the progression of many inflammatory disorders. These findings give us targets on the white blood cell that will allow us to develop therapeutics aimed at inhibiting their contribution to disease progression.”

The paper’s lead author is Chantal E. Ayres-Sander. Co-authors are Holly Lauridsen, Cheryl L. Maier, Parid Sava, and Jordan S. Pober.

The Hartwell Foundation, a Dubinsky New Initiatives Award, and the National Institutes of Health provided support for the research.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Life-Extending Hormone Bolsters Immunity
A hormone that extends lifespan in mice by 40% is produced by specialized cells in the thymus gland, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers.
Wednesday, January 13, 2016
Creating More Potent Vaccines
Yale researchers uncovered a new role for a type of immune cell, known as regulatory T cells, in promoting long-term immunity.
Wednesday, July 08, 2015
Researchers Solve Multiple Sclerosis Puzzle
Yale study shows the role that T cells play in MS.
Monday, May 18, 2015
New Tool To Explore Mysteries Of The Immune System
Yale scientists use CyTOF to study a range of conditions.
Monday, April 20, 2015
Cold Virus Replicates Better At Cooler Temperatures
Study shows that the immune response to rhinovirus is influenced by temperature.
Tuesday, January 06, 2015
New Class of Synthetic Molecules Mimics Antibodies
A Yale University lab has crafted the first synthetic molecules that have both the targeting and response functions of antibodies.
Wednesday, December 24, 2014
Protein Predicts Response To New Immunotherapy Drug
Trial shows that response to treatment may be predicted by the presence of an immune-suppressing protein in non-cancerous immune cells.
Friday, November 28, 2014
Immune System Surprise Hints at New Strategy for Fighting HIV
Surprising twist may open a new avenue in the fight.
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Immune Cells get Cancer-Fighting Boost From Nanomaterials
Yale researchers used bundled carbon nanotubes to incubate cytotoxic T cells.
Monday, August 18, 2014
Commonly Used Drugs May Not Be Effective Against Autoimmune Illness
The study appears in the Cell Press journal Immunity.
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Yale Team Implants Human Innate Immune Cells in Mice
Groundbreaking study has reproduced human immune function at a level not seen previously.
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Lung Disease and Melanoma: a Common Molecular Mechanism?
Researchers have solved a biological mystery about the common genesis of many serious diseases such as asthma and metastatic melanoma.
Monday, September 02, 2013
Drug Preserves Beta Cells in New Cases of Type 1 Diabetes
A drug in clinical trials has been shown to preserve insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells in nearly half of subjects newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.
Tuesday, August 06, 2013
Nature’s Own Nanoparticles Harnessed to Target Disease
Using a novel form of immune-genetic therapy, researchers have successfully inhibited a strong immune allergic inflammatory response in the skin of mice.
Friday, July 12, 2013
Promising Drug Prevents Cancer Cells from Shutting Down Immune System
An investigational drug that targets the immune system’s ability to fight cancer is showing promising results in Yale Cancer Center (YCC) patients.
Monday, June 10, 2013
Scientific News
Tricked-Out Immune Cells Could Attack Cancer
New cell-engineering technique may lead to precision immunotherapies.
Neural Networks Adapt to the Presence of a Toxic HIV Protein
HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) afflict approximately half of HIV infected patients.
HIV Protein Manipulates Hundreds of Human Genes
Findings search for new or improved treatments for patients with AIDS.
Breaking the Brain’s Garbage Disposal
The children’s ataxia gene problem turned out to be not such a big deal genetically — it was such a slight mutation that it barely changed the way the cells made the protein.
Flesh-Eating Bacteria Work Together
Scientists recently discovered different strains of deadly flesh-eating bacteria working together to spread infection and they now have a better understanding of the role of the toxins they produce. The discovery could change how the illness and other diseases are treated.
Utilizing Antibodies from Ebola Survivors
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University, The Scripps Research Institute and Integral Molecular Inc. have learned that antibodies in the blood of people who have survived a strain of the Ebola virus can kill various types of Ebola.
Antibiotic Use in Early Life Disrupts Gut Microbiota
The use of antibiotics in early childhood interferes with normal development of the intestinal microbiota, shows research conducted at the University of Helsinki.
Easier Diagnosis for Fungal Infection of the Lungs
A new clinical imaging method developed in collaboration with a University of Exeter academic may enable doctors to tackle one of the main killers of patients with weakened immune systems sooner and more effectively.
Mitochondrial Troublemakers Unmasked in Lupus
Drivers of autoimmune disease inflammation discovered in the traps of pathogen-capturing white blood cells.
Important Regulator of Immune System Decoded
Plasma cells play a key role in our immune system. Now scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, Austria, and at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (WEHI) in Melbourne, Australia, succeeded in characterizing a central regulator of plasma cell function.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!