Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

High Level of Antibodies Linked to Cognitive Decline

Published: Thursday, March 28, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, March 28, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers found that people with high levels of antibodies to five common infections in their blood, previously shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, also are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline.

The researchers used a test called infectious burden (IB) on blood samples from 1,625 participants in the multi-ethnic Northern Manhattan Study; the average age of participants was 69. IB measures exposure to three viruses (herpes simplex types 1 and 2 and cytomegalovirus) and two bacteria (Chlamydia pneumonia and Helicobacter pylori).

The subjects were given a cognitive assessment, the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE). Those who had higher IB scores had a 25 percent higher risk of scoring more poorly on the MMSE.

“The link was strongest among women, those with lower socioeconomic status, and—most notably—those who did not exercise,” said lead author Mira Katan, MD, postdoctoral fellow at the Neurological Institute at Columbia University Medical Center.

As the population ages, clinicians will have an ever greater need for ways to determine risk of cognitive loss. The link between elevated IB and cognitive loss could provide one such tool.

“Infectious burden and cognitive decline” was published in the March 26, 2013, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,900+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Can We Break the Link Between Obesity and Diabetes?
Columbia University researchers identify a key molecule involved in the development of type 2 diabetes.
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
What Do Animal Viruses Have to Do with Human Health?
Simon Anthony studies animal infections to prevent outbreaks in people.
Monday, September 28, 2015
Scientific News
Breakthrough Flu Vaccine Inhibited by Pre-existing Antibodies
Universal truths – how existing antibodies are sabotaging the most promising new human flu vaccines.
Antibody Drug Shows Promise in HIV Treatment
Researchers are a step closer to an alternative HIV treatment that has the potential for lasting effects and less frequent dosing.
Targeting Autoimmunity
Researchers have developed a strategy to treat a rare autoimmune disease which could lead to treatments of other autoimmune diseases.
Flu Vaccine May Reduce Death Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
New research suggests that a new flu vaccine may reduce probability of type 2 diabetes patients being hospitalised with stroke and heart failure.
Gut Bacteria Older than Human Species
Some bacteria have lived in the human gut since before we were human, suggesting evolution could have a larger role inhuman bacterial makeup.
Evidence of Mosquito Transmitting Zika
A direct link between the Yellow fever mosquito and Zika transmission has been found following investigation into selective mosquito control.
Antibody-Based Drug for Multiple Sclerosis
New antibody-based drug paves the way for new strategies for controlling and treating multiple sclerosis.
Three-Drug Combinations Counter Antibiotic Resistance
Research shows that combinations of three different antibiotics can treat resistant bacteria, even if they are ineffective independently.
Mapping Zika’s Routes to Developing Fetus
UC researchers show how Zika virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus, and also identified a drug that could stop it.
Treating HIV with Cancer-Fighting Gene Shows Promise
A type of gene immunotherapy that has shown promising results against cancer could also be used against HIV.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,900+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!