Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Mersana Therapeutics Presents Positive Data on Next-Gen Antibody-Drug Conjugate Technology

Published: Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Conjugation technology advancements further demonstrate stability, activity and selectivity of Mersana’s ADCs.

Mersana Therapeutics, Inc. announced that new data related to its conjugation technology used to create next-generation ADCs is being presented in a poster session at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). AACR is being held April 6-10, 2013 in Washington, D.C. The preclinical data being presented confirms that Mersana’s technology generates cysteine-conjugated ADCs that are stable, highly active and selective in Her-2 expressing tumor models.

In the poster, Mersana details that its technology, which has previously been applied to create lysine-based ADCs, can also be expanded to create cysteine-based ADCs. The data show that conjugation of Mersana’s Fleximer polymer via cysteines in the antibody hinge region overcomes the destabilization of the antibody which has been reported with conventional, direct drug-cysteine linked ADCs. The stabilization with the Fleximer conjugation approach enhances the advantages of Mersana’s polymer approach to ADCs, which include significantly higher capacity for drug payload, superior payload flexibility and improved physicochemical properties. In this research, the benefits were shown in Her-2 expressing cell lines and preclinical models.

“Mersana has previously demonstrated that our Fleximer-based ADCs that utilize lysine modification are highly efficacious,” said Timothy B. Lowinger, Chief Scientific Officer of Mersana. “These data demonstrate that the scope of our conjugation technology can also be expanded to create novel, highly stable cysteine-based ADCs that are highly active, selective and well-tolerated in preclinical tumor models.”

”Research into how we can expand our technology is part of our commitment to creating truly next-generation ADCs that have the potential to address limitations of other technologies,” said Nicholas Bacopoulos, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Mersana. “These types of technological advancements will be utilized as we build our proprietary pipeline of ADC candidates and forge collaborations.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
3 Ways Viruses Have Changed Science for the Better
Viruses are really good at what they do, and we’ve been able to harness their skills to learn about – and potentially improve – human health in several ways.
Mixed Up Cell Transportation Key Piece of ALS and Dementia Puzzle
Researchers from the University of Toronto are one step closer to solving this incredibly complex puzzle, offering hope for treatment.
Antibody Treatment Efficacious in Psoriasis
An experimental, biologic treatment, brodalumab, achieved 100 percent reduction in psoriasis symptoms in twice as many patients as a second, commonly used treatment, according to the results of a multicenter clinical trial led by Mount Sinai researchers.
Four Gut Bacteria Decrease Asthma Risk in Infants
New research by scientists at UBC and BC Children’s Hospital finds that infants can be protected from getting asthma if they acquire four types of gut bacteria by three months of age.
Escape Prevention
Studying flu virus structure brings us a step closer to a permanent vaccine.
New Molecular Marker for Killer Cells
Cell marker enables prognosis about the course of infections.
Editing Genes to Create HIV Killers
Seattle scientists have managed to genetically transform human cells in the lab from HIV targets to HIV killers, and the technique could have implications for cancer and other diseases.
Antibiotic Overuse Might be Why so Many People Have Allergies
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that drug resistant bacteria cause 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses each year.
Molecular ‘Kiss Of Death’ Flags Pathogens For Destruction
Researchers have discovered that our bodies mark pathogen-containing vacuoles for destruction by using a molecule called ubiquitin, commonly known as the "kiss of death."
Opening the Door to Safer, More Precise Cancer Therapies
New method regulates when, and how strongly, cancer-killing therapeutic T cells are activated.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos