Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Curie-Cancer and Roche Strengthen Partnership

Published: Friday, May 17, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, May 17, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Curie-Cancer and Roche build on four years partnership by increasing translational research programs, speeding up development of new cancer treatments.

Curie-Cancer and the Roche Institute for Research and Translational Medicine are strengthening their collaborative efforts.

In 2009, the Institut Curie and Roche signed an initial three-year agreement to partner one another in a major pre-clinical research program.

The aim of the partnership was the better understanding of the mechanism of action of a new Roche antibody to target under-served highly aggressive forms of breast cancer. This antibody was the first in a new therapeutic class.

The partnership gave Roche access to a platform of pre-clinical models, developed by the research teams at the Institut Curie. These models are highly representative of the tumors observed in patients.

Using this platform, Roche was able to determine in which sub-type of breast cancer the antibody was most effective. The Institut Curie also owns the RPPA platform (Reverse Phase Protein Analysis), globally one of the most sophisticated tools of its kind due to the number of cell activity markers it allows users to investigate.

Using this platform, researchers were able to gain a more detailed understanding of the impact of the Roche antibody on the cancer cells at the molecular level, also to identify predictive response markers.

By combining the expertise of the teams at Curie-Cancer and Roche during the pre-clinical development phase for the molecule, it was possible to develop a better-defined protocol for the first clinical trials. This was a key factor in maximizing the success of these trials.

"This first partnership between the research teams at the Institut Curie and Roche has been an extremely positive experience," said Celine Bouquet, director of the Roche Institute for Research and Translational Medicine.

Bouquet continued, "The close relationship between the clinical and research teams meant that it was a natural choice for Roche to select the Institut Curie as the center for phase I of its clinical development work [administration of the drug to the first human patients]. The first patient in the world to trial this new treatment was an Institut Curie patient."

Curie-Cancer and Roche are currently working on several translational research programs involving Roche molecules that make use of the same technology.

As one example, a team of Curie-Cancer clinicians, anatomopathologists and researchers are working on developing a new Roche molecule targeting the tumor environment.

This is an example of how the Institut Curie successfully spans the complete development process from pure research to translational research to clinical research. In doing so it encompasses the vision of its founder Marie Curie.

"It is vital that pharmaceutical laboratories consult with us about their needs and questions early in the molecule development process. This allows us to propose partnership options that offer a wealth of expertise and a wide range of technological platforms. Scientific discussions of this kind also allow us to identify new, innovative approaches, some of which are based on pure research findings," said Sergio Roman-Roman, director of translational research at the Institut Curie.

Prominent academic research institutes such as the Institut Curie have developed a number of technological platforms to assist their own research work.

They are a real asset for research programs conducted hand in hand with industry partners. These platforms require significant investment, some of which is provided by governments.

"This partnership with Roche has shown, once again, that research conducted by the Institut Curie perfectly meets the requirements of our industry partners," said Damien Salauze, director of Curie-Cancer.

Salauze continued, "In 2011, Curie-Cancer was awarded the Carnot label in recognition of the quality of its research. We seek to make this knowledge available to partners of all sizes, whether they are small or medium-sized enterprises or international groups, with the ultimate aim of benefiting patients."

Pure research is a source of knowledge, while clinical research is the motor of medical progress. Translational research forms the link between the two. It provides a solution to speed up the development of new treatment options through an improved understanding of cancer biology.

In particular, translational research enables scientists to define predictive markers in order to assess the effectiveness of new molecules and better identify the patient sub-groups that are most likely to benefit from them.

"Translational research brings all the different players together, for the benefit of everyone. We want to promote this way of working, so that patients have access to new treatment options sooner," said Corinne Le Goff, president of Roche Pharma France and of the Roche Institute for Research and Translational Medicine.

Goff continued, "Following the success of this first partnership, we are keen to work with Curie-Cancer as a preferred partner on our upcoming pre-clinical studies involving Roche molecules."


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,100+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Getting a Better Look at How HIV Infects and Takes Over its Host Cells
A new approach, developed by a team of researchers led by The Rockefeller University and The Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC), offers an unprecedented view of how a virus infects and appropriates a host cell, step by step.
Untangling Disease-Related Protein Misfolding
Work advances understanding of genetic forms of thrombosis, emphysema, cirrhosis of the liver, neurodegenerative diseases and inflammation, among others.
Developing a More Precise Seasonal Flu Vaccine
During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world’s vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective.
Fighting Cancer with Borrowed Immunity
A new step in cancer immunotherapy: researchers from the Netherlands Cancer Institute and University of Oslo/Oslo University Hospital show that even if one's own immune cells cannot recognize and fight their tumors, someone else's immune cells might.
Loss Of Y Chromosome Increases Risk Of Alzheimer’s
Men with blood cells that do not carry the Y chromosome are at greater risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. This is in addition to an increased risk of death from other causes, including many cancers. These new findings by researchers at Uppsala University could lead to a simple test to identify those at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Immune Cells Remember Their First Meal
Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response – a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases.
"Sunscreen" Gene May Guard Against Melanoma
USC-led study reveals that melanoma patients with deficient or mutant copies of the gene are less protected from harmful ultraviolet rays.
Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play Role in Tumor Growth
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have reported a new mechanism that helps cancer cells engage myeloid-derived suppressor cells.
Drug Might Help Treat Sepsis
A DNA enzyme called Top1 plays a key role in turning on genes that cause inflammation in mouse and human cells in response to pathogens. A drug blocking this enzyme rescued mice from lethal inflammatory responses, suggesting a potential treatment for sepsis.
Large-scale HIV Vaccine Trial to Launch in South Africa
NIH-funded study will test safety, efficacy of vaccine regimen.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,100+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!