Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Can an Improvement in Pipetting Deliver Cost Savings and Protect Staff

Published: Friday, June 14, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, June 14, 2013
Bookmark and Share
New white paper on pipetting ergonomics aims to protect researchers.

Pipetting is a forceful and repetitive activity, and there is a strong association between pipetting and the occurrence of repetitive motion injuries.

In fact, pipetting for just over an hour a day over the course of a year is enough to put researchers at risk, and the chances increase exponentially with workload and age.

A new white paper about “The Ergonomics of Pipetting” has now been published by Mettler Toledo. It draws on recently published papers by ergonomic scientists and discusses various aspects of pipetting; the ergonomic risks involved and best practice for either avoiding or mitigating them.

By ensuring researchers are using the safest pipetting methods, labs are not only protecting staff but also avoiding costly delays and downtime that may be a result of injury or less efficient working practices.

The white paper investigates the sources of repetitive motion injuries. Tip loading and ejection, as well as plunger forces and the force required to change the aspiration volume, are found to contribute to repetitive strain injuries (RSI).

The white paper gives advice on how to reduce the risk of RSI, and what to look for when buying a pipette by ergonomic standards.

Mettler Toledo was the first manufacturer to focus on user safety and repetitive stress injury, incorporating an ergonomic design into all of its pipettes.

The white paper can be downloaded at: http://glo.mt.com/global/en/home/supportive_content/White_Papers/Pipe_Ergo_WhitePaper.html


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Sorting Through Cellular Statistics
Aaron Dinner, professor in chemistry, and his graduate student Herman Gudjonson are trying to read the manual of life, DNA, as part of the Dinner group’s research into bioinformatics—the application of statistics to biological research.
Women’s Immune System Genes Operate Differently from Men’s
A new technology reveals that immune system genes switch on and off differently in women and men, and the source of that variation is not primarily in the DNA.
Experimental MERS Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Studies
A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines.
HIV Susceptibility Linked to Little-Understood Immune Cell Class
High levels of diversity among immune cells called natural killer cells may strongly predispose people to infection by HIV, and may be driven by prior viral exposures, according to a new study.
New Weapon in the Fight Against Blood Cancer
This strategy, which uses patients’ own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable.
Scientists Create CRISPR/Cas9 Knock-In Mutations in Human T Cells
In a project spearheaded by investigators at UC San Francisco, scientists have devised a new strategy to precisely modify human T cells using the genome-editing system known as CRISPR/Cas9.
Researchers Develop Vaccine that Protects Primates Against Ebola
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the National Institutes of Health have developed an inhalable vaccine that protects primates against Ebola.
Universal Flu Vaccine in the Works
A new study has demonstrated a potential strategy for developing a flu vaccine with potent, broad protection.
Immunotherapy Shows Promise for Myeloma
A strategy, which uses patients’ own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable.
Immune System 'On Switch' Breakthrough Could Lead to Targeted Drugs
A crucial 'on switch' that boosts the body's defenses against infections has been successfully identified in new scientific research.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!