Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Patented, a Molecule that Opens the Door to Develop New Drugs Against Immune Rejection

Published: Thursday, August 01, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, August 01, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers have patented a peptide that inhibits the immune response activated by the enzyme calcineurin which could serve to develop new more specific immunosuppressive drugs.

The results of the study that describes this molecular mechanism have been published in the journal Molecular Cell Research.
Current drugs
Patients undergoing a transplant need nowadays a treatment for life to stop the immune response generated by the rejection of his body towards a foreign organism. Drugs that are used currently, cyclosporin A and FK506, inhibit calcineurin, which is the enzyme that activates the immune response. The problem is that their mechanism of action is to stop all the other tracks that activate this enzyme causing numerous side effects.
“The purpose of the investigation is to develop new and more specific drugs, that inhibit only the immune response triggered by the calcineurin and not all of its other functions”, explained the researcher Mercedes Pérez.

In previous studies, the team of Perez had already described a peptide of the protein family RCAN able to join the calcineurin and to inhibit specifically the activation of the immune response. In this work, the researchers of the IDIBELL have modified this peptide and further discovered that when this peptide is phosphorylated by protein CK2 (phosphorylation is a regulatory mechanism of proteins that involves the addition of a phosphate group) increases its immunosuppressive power.

 “We have patented this phosphorylated peptide that in addition to its potential as an immunosuppressor will allow us to search for mimetic molecules which do the same function but are more stable, allowing us to be able to translate to the clinic”,  explained the researcher.

The study was conducted in collaboration with the University of Barcelona, the Autonomous University of Barcelona and the Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB).

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Genetically Modified Stem Cells are Effective Against Acute Respiratory Diseases
Administration of genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells regenerates lung tissue and stops the inflammatory process in mice with acute lung injury.
Tuesday, June 18, 2013
Identified a Key Protein in Maintaining the Identity of B Lymphocytes
This finding could be useful for the study of blood diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia.
Monday, June 10, 2013
IDIBELL Licenses to Janus a Patent for the Treatment of Immune Diseases
The technology has been developed entirely in the Institute.
Thursday, December 06, 2012
We Need Bacteria to Maintain a Good Immune System
Dr. Francisco Guarner, from the Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, talked about the functions of the bacteria in our body in the IDIBELL Seminar.
Thursday, October 25, 2012
Scientific News
A Cellular Symphony Responsible for Autoimmune Disease
Broad Institute researchers have used a novel approach to increase our understanding of the immune system as a whole.
Genetic Basis of Fatal Flu Side Effect Discovered
A group of people with fatal H1N1 flu died after their viral infections triggered a deadly hyperinflammatory disorder in susceptible individuals with gene mutations linked to the overactive immune response, according to a recent study.
Developing Drug Resistance may be a Matter of Diversity for Tuberculosis
Researchers have probed the bacteria that causes tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to learn more about how individual bacterial cells change and adapt while in the human body.
Surprising Trait Found in Anti-HIV Antibodies
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have new weapons in the fight against HIV.
Some Gut Microbes May Be Keystones of Health
University of Oregon scientists have found that strength in numbers doesn’t hold true for microbes in the intestines. A minority population of the right type might hold the key to regulating good health.
Essential Component of Antiviral Defense Identified
Infectious disease researchers at the University of Georgia have identified a signaling protein critical for host defense against influenza infection.
Single Vaccine for Chikungunya, Related Viruses May be Possible
What if a single vaccine could protect people from infection by many different viruses? That concept is a step closer to reality.
Is Allergy the Price We Pay for Our Immunity to Parasites?
New findings help demonstrate the evolutionary basis for allergy.
Blocking the Transmission Of Malaria Parasites
Vaccine candidate administered for the first time in humans in a phase I clinical trial led by Oxford University’s Jenner Institute, with partners Imaxio and GSK.
Mucus – the First Line of Defence
Researchers reveal the important role of mucus in building a good defence against invaders.

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos