Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Genalyte and Barbara Davis Diabetes Center Collaborate

Published: Friday, August 16, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, August 16, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Genalyte launches multiplexed biomarker panel that measures seven autoantigens associated with the development of T1D.

Genalyte, Inc. has announced the launch of its Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) antigen panel that runs on the Maverick™ Detection System.

The Genalyte T1D antigen panel is the first multiplexed assay that measures seven autoantibodies associated with the destruction of pancreatic islet cells seen in type 1 diabetes.

In a related development, Genalyte reported that it is collaborating with the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes (BDC) at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to further develop and test multiplexed antigen panels for the early detection of T1D.

The Genalyte T1D antigen panel was developed as part of the first phase of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant awarded to Genalyte to develop multiplexed assays for the early detection and monitoring of type 1 diabetes.

The $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases also provides support for expansion of the approach to allow autoantibody response profiling by multiple criteria, which is expected to enhance the ability of researchers and clinicians to detect and monitor the development of the disease.

Martin Gleeson, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer of Genalyte, noted, “The pioneering work of Drs. George Eisenbarth and Liping Yu at BDC established assays for the measurement of islet autoantibodies. These rogue elements of the immune system eventually destroy the pancreatic islet cells that produce insulin. The unique capabilities of our Maverick detection platform have the potential to provide researchers and clinicians with tools to detect and track this process from an early stage, when interventions to interrupt the disease process may be feasible.”

An estimated three million individuals in the U.S. have T1D, an autoimmune disorder that leads to life-long dependence on insulin injections.

New disease-modifying therapies may have the potential to reduce or stop the destruction of islet cells in patients at risk of developing T1D.

The availability of tools to identify these patients early in the disease process would facilitate the development and use of these preventative therapies.

“We are pleased to offer our innovative T1D antigen panel to diabetes researchers worldwide at the same time that we are working with Dr. Liping Yu and his lab at the Barbara Davis Diabetes Center to expand the utility of the approach,” added Dr. Gleeson. “BDC is a long-time leader in the quest to develop curative therapies for type 1 diabetes, and we are delighted to collaborate with them to develop the tools that may help make this dream a reality.”

The Genalyte T1D antigen panel requires only a 2 to 5 μL serum or plasma sample and provides results in less than 15 minutes, without the use of dyes, fluorescent probes or radioactive labels.

The T1D panel measures autoantibodies to insulin, proinsulin, GAD 65, GAD 67, IA-2 (PTPRN, ICA512), phogrin (PTPRN2, IA-2ß) and ZnT8 (SLC30A8). For more information, visit

Other commercially available tests for the Maverick Detection System include MT-ADA, ENA 4, ENA 6 and ANA 14 assay kits.

Additionally, Genalyte offers researchers a Custom Spotting Service that loads proteins supplied by customers, such as antibodies, peptides, biomarkers, cytokines and antigens, on to standard-format Genalyte chips that are ready to be run on the Maverick System.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Genalyte Signs on European Distributors as Maverick System Gains CE Mark
Mokascience, Bucher Biotec and KRD Molecular Technologies will distribute Maverick system and Genalyte multiplex assays in selected European territories.
Thursday, July 25, 2013
Genalyte Wins $500K for Early Detection of Type 1 Diabetes
Unique multiplexing capabilities of Maverick™ detection system could enable early detection of Type 1 diabetes and allow for potentially curative interventions.
Thursday, December 13, 2012
Next Gen Multiplexing Firm Genalyte Raises $12M Series B Financing
Maverick platform is much simpler, faster and more sensitive, flexible and cost-effective than current options.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
Scientific News
Antibiotic Overuse Might be Why so Many People Have Allergies
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that drug resistant bacteria cause 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses each year.
Molecular ‘Kiss Of Death’ Flags Pathogens For Destruction
Researchers have discovered that our bodies mark pathogen-containing vacuoles for destruction by using a molecule called ubiquitin, commonly known as the "kiss of death."
Opening the Door to Safer, More Precise Cancer Therapies
New method regulates when, and how strongly, cancer-killing therapeutic T cells are activated.
Vaccination On The Horizon For Severe Viral Infection Of The Brain
Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich reveal possible new treatment methods for a rare, usually fatal brain disease.
What Do Animal Viruses Have to Do with Human Health?
Simon Anthony studies animal infections to prevent outbreaks in people.
‘Immune Camouflage’ may Explain H7N9 Influenza Vaccine Failure
The study is published in Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics.
How Flu Viruses Gain The Ability To Spread
New study reveals the soft palate is a key site for evolution of airborne transmissibility.
New Cell Type May Help Explain Dangerous Food Allergies
Researchers have discovered a new cell type that appears to drive life-threatening food allergies and may help explain why some people get severe allergic reactions and others do not.
Scientists Create Immunity to Deadly Parasite by Manipulating Host’s Genes
Research suggests a novel approach to boosting immunity by removing the mechanism that allows pathogens to cause disease.
10 to 1: Bugs Win in NASA study
Bugs are winning out, and that's a good thing according to NASA's Human Research Program.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos