Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

ChromaTrap Receives Positive Commentary in Cited Research

Published: Thursday, March 20, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, March 20, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Researchers cite how using the fast, sensitive ChIP technology has benefited their research.

Porvair Sciences reports on positive commentary by researchers in published papers citing how using the fast, sensitive ChromaTrap™ Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology has benefited their research.

In a paper by C.R Williams et al (Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 303: C213-C223, 2012) - Chromatrap was used to assess the occupation of NFkB p65 onto the Nox4 promoter in human aortic endothelial cells which had been treated with normal and high glucose.

ChIP data using Chromatrap pro A spin columns demonstrated that in high glucose concentrations NfkB binding to the Nox4 promoter was increased when compared to normal glucose concentrations and rosiglitazone attenuated NfkB binding to the promoter.

Their findings illustrated that NFkB/p65-Nox4 axis as an important target of rosigliatzone in vascular endothelial cells following hyperglycemia.

In a paper by C.Sullivan et al (PLOS ONE, Dec 2012, 7 (12), pp 7-13) Chromatrap was used to look at the association of FOXM1 transcription factor onto the CDC25A gene in a human (U205) osteosarcoma cell line and a CWR22rv prostate cancer cell line.

Binding activity of FOXM1 onto CDC25A was assessed using Chromatrap Pro A columns which showed a significant enrichment of FOXM1 onto the CDC25A gene when compared to negative IgG in both cell lines.

The study supports the hypothesis and reports a novel mechanism by which CDC25A is a direct target gene of the FOXM1 transcription factor.

Both papers make use of the higher speed of the Chromatrap ChIP protocol (less than 5 hours), the ease of use of a solid-state assay and the excellent DNA pull down and high signal to noise ratio driven by the kit’s very low non-specific binding.

Launched worldwide in 2012 - The Chromatrap® solid-state ChIP technology has been shown in many projects to be more efficient than conventional bead-based methods. This is because the solid phase porous polymer, functionalized with either protein A or G, provides a greater surface area for chromatin antibody binding with very low non-specific binding.

In addition, it uses a spin column approach, offering significant speed, process and carry-over advantages over sepharose or magnetic beads.

DNA pull down with Chromatrap® is up to 25 times more than conventional methods, whilst the signal to noise ratio for DNA enrichment is 2 to 3 times better, even with low chromatin samples between 50ng to 3000ng per immunoprecipitation.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Antibody Treatment Efficacious in Psoriasis
An experimental, biologic treatment, brodalumab, achieved 100 percent reduction in psoriasis symptoms in twice as many patients as a second, commonly used treatment, according to the results of a multicenter clinical trial led by Mount Sinai researchers.
Four Gut Bacteria Decrease Asthma Risk in Infants
New research by scientists at UBC and BC Children’s Hospital finds that infants can be protected from getting asthma if they acquire four types of gut bacteria by three months of age.
Escape Prevention
Studying flu virus structure brings us a step closer to a permanent vaccine.
New Molecular Marker for Killer Cells
Cell marker enables prognosis about the course of infections.
Editing Genes to Create HIV Killers
Seattle scientists have managed to genetically transform human cells in the lab from HIV targets to HIV killers, and the technique could have implications for cancer and other diseases.
Antibiotic Overuse Might be Why so Many People Have Allergies
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that drug resistant bacteria cause 23,000 deaths and two million illnesses each year.
Molecular ‘Kiss Of Death’ Flags Pathogens For Destruction
Researchers have discovered that our bodies mark pathogen-containing vacuoles for destruction by using a molecule called ubiquitin, commonly known as the "kiss of death."
Opening the Door to Safer, More Precise Cancer Therapies
New method regulates when, and how strongly, cancer-killing therapeutic T cells are activated.
Vaccination On The Horizon For Severe Viral Infection Of The Brain
Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich reveal possible new treatment methods for a rare, usually fatal brain disease.
What Do Animal Viruses Have to Do with Human Health?
Simon Anthony studies animal infections to prevent outbreaks in people.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos