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Flexible Forward Scatter Technology Enables Advances

Published: Thursday, May 01, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 06, 2014
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MoFlo® Astrios EQ from Beckman Coulter Life Sciences Delivers Simultaneous High-speed Cell Sorting and Sub-micron Particle Detection.

The six-way jet-in-air sorter from Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, delivers patent pending enhanced dual forward scatter (eFSC) technology for simultaneous sorting and detection of particles from 200 nm to 30 µm in diameter.  The instrument sets a new standard for flow cytometry core facilities, delivering high-speed cell sorting and micro-particle detection in a single package.  Featuring detailed and precise forward scatter resolution, beadless drop sample handling and increased biosafety, Astrios EQ meets a range of analysis needs.  

Intellisort II, the world’s first and only beadless drop-delay technology , eliminates the need for bead-based drop-delay routines.  This alleviates the requirement to remove sterile samples during drop-delay recalculation due to nozzle blockages and ensures uninterrupted sort sterility.  Intellisort II’s ability to maintain droplet breakoff for uninterrupted aseptic sorting helps to preserve sort integrity.  

A broad standard laser palette provides more wavelength choices than is found in most standard cuvette-based systems.  In fully configured instruments, users can reduce compensation requirements through the use of up to seven spatially separated lasers across 32 parameters simultaneously (out of a palette of 51 parameters).  Six of seven laser choices can be configured as the primary laser used in eFSC detection.  Dual eFSC permits measurement of scatter characteristics across three orders of magnitude simultaneously.  Choice of wavelength extends eFSC detection within 405-640 nm, allowing small and large particle detection.

Researchers can work with a great range of biological samples, analysing and sorting cells from microsomes to macrophages, from astrocytes to xenografts. Examples of non-biological applications could include agarose gel droplets, gold nanoparticles or environmental particulates.  Single-cell applications include circulating tumor cells, drug discovery, rare event analysis, stem and neuronal cells and ecological and physiological microbes.

“By combining high-speed sorting and micro-particle detection in a single package, the MoFlo Astrios EQ will be tremendously useful to the flow cytometry core facility,” said Mario Koksch, vice president and general manager of the Cytometry Business Unit for Beckman Coulter Life Sciences.  “Researchers should find its spectrum of sample-handling, multi-laser options, beadless drop delay and enhanced forward scatter technology make for a powerful and flexible instrument.”

An optional Baker Company SterilGARD® Class II biological safety cabinet can be fully integrated with the MoFlo Astrios EQ to provide assured biological safety.  An auto-quality control function monitors sheath pressure, sample pressure, average event rate, start and end times, nozzle size, differential between measured parameters and pass/fail thresholds.  Summit 6.2.2 software allows acquisition and storage of over one billion events, across multiple parameters, while sorting.  Astrios EQ accommodates currently available plate and slide-based sorting options, including standard and custom formats.  


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