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Kaluza for Gallios Delivers Ease of Use, Analytical Power for Researchers

Published: Saturday, May 10, 2014
Last Updated: Saturday, May 10, 2014
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Beckman Coulter offers new software package for data acquisition in cytometry, for use across cell analysis applications.

Kaluza for Gallios software combines cutting edge data acquisition tools with remarkable ease of use to increase efficiency and performance in the cell characterization and analysis workflow of core research laboratories.

Researchers at all levels of experience can learn the system quickly using this next generation acquisition software for the Beckman Coulter Gallios cytometer.

Users maximize productivity and data output through novel functionalities, such as the ability to set up experimental protocols offline and a Gallios simulator, which facilitates instrument training without running live experiments.

The new software combines with Kaluza Analysis, a leading cytometry data analysis programme, and together the packages provide a total cytometry data management solution.

Kaluza for Gallios features a guided Windows-based drag-and-drop interface that is intuitive and facilitates easy creation of the right setup for accurate plot output. Visual management tools enable tracking of instrument function and experiment progress. Voltage and compensation can be quickly, accurately and intuitively changed.

The wizard function makes it easy to create compensation matrices, and a radial menu means minimal click-through while creating gates and accessing editing tools. Unlimited “undo” aids new users.

Gallios flow cytometers couple excellent sensitivity, resolution and dynamic range with high-speed data collection. Digital signal processing is accurate at high event rates over a range of fluorescence intensities.

The systems house up to three solid-state lasers, with red and blue standard and violet or yellow available as an option, and have easily interchangeable optical filters for detection of a variety of dyes and wavelengths.

An innovative forward-scatter detector provides up to three measurements of cell size and visualization of particles down to 0.404 µm in diameter, and fluorescent detectors enable concurrent reading of up to 10 colours.

“Researchers will use the time savings, flexibility and analytical power of Kaluza for Gallios to further their experiments and make lab time more productive,” said Sharlene Wright, senior manager at Beckman Coulter Flow Cytometry. “Offering a version of the software that is dedicated to enhancing the performance of the market leading Kaluza Analysis and Gallios will help researchers achieve greater productivity. It continues the vision of Kaluza platform development - implementing this powerful analytical product to simplify complex flow cytometry data acquisition.”

Kaluza for Gallios flow cytometry analysis software is for research use only and is provided on a Windows 7 (64-bit) operating system. Examples of Kaluza’s unique data analysis tools can be viewed at www.kaluzasoftware.com, and a fully functional trial version can be ordered. Offline software for Kaluza for Gallios and the Gallios simulator is available at www.kaluzasoftware.com.


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