Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Immunology
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Immune Response Affects Sleep and Memory

Published: Friday, June 13, 2014
Last Updated: Friday, June 13, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Sickness-induced insomnia is common because of link between brain and immune system.

Fighting off illness- rather than the illness itself- causes sleep deprivation and affects memory, a new study has found.

University of Leicester biologist Dr Eamonn Mallon said a common perception is that if you are sick, you sleep more.

But the study, carried out in flies, found that sickness induced insomnia is quite common.

The research has been published in the journal PeerJ at: http://peerj.com/articles/434.

Dr Mallon said: “Think about when you are sick. Your sleep is disturbed and you’re generally not feeling at your sharpest. Previously work has been carried out showing that being infected leads to exactly these behaviours in fruit flies.

“In this paper we show that it can be the immune system itself that can cause these problems. By turning on the immune system in flies artificially (with no infection present) we reduced how long they slept and how well they performed in a memory test.

“This is an interesting result as these connections between the brain and the immune system have come to the fore recently in medicine. It seems to be because the two systems speak the same chemical language and often cross-talk. Having a model of this in the fly, one of the main systems used in genetic research will be a boost to the field.

“The key message of this study is that the immune response, sleep and memory seem to be intimately linked. Medicine is beginning to study these links between the brain and the immune system in humans. Having an easy to use insect model would be very helpful.”

Funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Dr Mallon carried out the study with Ezio Rosato (Genetics), Robert Holdbrook (Biology undergraduate) and Akram Alghamdi (Taif University, Saudi Arabia while a PhD student at Leicester).


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Gut Bacteria Older than Human Species
Some bacteria have lived in the human gut since before we were human, suggesting evolution could have a larger role inhuman bacterial makeup.
Evidence of Mosquito Transmitting Zika
A direct link between the Yellow fever mosquito and Zika transmission has been found following investigation into selective mosquito control.
Antibody-Based Drug for Multiple Sclerosis
New antibody-based drug paves the way for new strategies for controlling and treating multiple sclerosis.
Three-Drug Combinations Counter Antibiotic Resistance
Research shows that combinations of three different antibiotics can treat resistant bacteria, even if they are ineffective independently.
Mapping Zika’s Routes to Developing Fetus
UC researchers show how Zika virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus, and also identified a drug that could stop it.
Treating HIV with Cancer-Fighting Gene Shows Promise
A type of gene immunotherapy that has shown promising results against cancer could also be used against HIV.
Protein Teams Activate T-Cells
Caltech researchers have discovered T-cell genetic switching is controlled by four proteins acting in a multi-tiered fashion.
'Antigen-Presenting Cell' Defends Against Cancer
Through advanced imaging, researchers have identified cells that encourages increases in immune system cancer defences.
Zika Epidemic Likely to End Within Three Years
A team of scientists has predicted that the current Zika epidemic is likely to end within three years because there will be too few people left to infect.
Go-Between Immune Cell is Key to Priming the Body’s Fight Against Cancer
‘Antigen-presenting cell’ activates T cells by alerting them to the presence of tumors.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!