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Extracorporeal Elimination of Circulating Exosomes as a Therapeutic Adjunct to Address Infectious Disease and Cancer
SelectBio

The Aethlon Hemopurifier® is a first-in-class device that targets the rapid elimination of infectious disease and cancer glycopathogens from circulation. In cancer, the Hemopurifier has been demonstrated to capture exosomes underlying lymphoma, melanoma, ovarian, and breast cancer. These microvesicular particles trigger apoptosis of immune cells and have been reported to facilitate tumor growth, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance. In design, the Hemopurifier consists of the affinity lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) immobilized in the outer-capillary space of plasma membrane technologies. The resulting mechanism provides selective target elimination as GNA binds high mannose signatures abundant on the surface of exosomes and viral glycoproteins. Studies of hepatitis c (HCV) infected patients receiving a three-treatment Hemopurifier protocol combined with interferon-based standard of care resulted in undetectable HCV in as little as seven days in hard-to-treat genotype-1 patients. The studies also documented the ability of the Hemopurifier to capture as many as 300 billion HCV copies during a single six- hour treatment. The FDA recently approved an IDE that allows for the initiation of US feasibility studies.

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