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Dotmatics Vortex Selected to Boost Drug Discovery Efforts at The University of Leeds

Published: Tuesday, February 12, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, February 12, 2013
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Dotmatics announced that it has deployed Vortex for data analysis and visualisation at the University of Leeds, UK.

Dotmatics Limited announced that the University of Leeds has deployed Vortex, its premium scientific intelligence tool, to analyse complex data and help with its life science research efforts.
Vortex gives scientists a more intuitive and versatile way to analyse and visualise large amounts of scientific data, providing them with the right tools to make their decisions faster. With an easy to use, interactive dashboard, Vortex quickly allows the manipulation of vast amounts of data points, including chemical structures, using just a standard PC or laptop. Vortex connects terabytes of disparate data from multiple data sources, giving scientists a holistic view of the information. It also contains a toolset of interactive plots, algorithms and tables that enable scientists to effortlessly harness the knowledge hidden behind the mountains of data.

Professor Adam Nelson from University of Leeds said ‘We have a major programme that is focusing on devising versatile ways to prepare diverse lead-like molecular scaffolds. Vortex's intuitive graphical interface allows us to visualise the properties of large numbers of compounds, and allows us to prioritise which molecular scaffolds are likely to have most value in drug discovery. The on-going training and support - provided on-site and online by Dotmatics - has been excellent, and has allowed us to get the most out of Vortex. We look forward to continuing to work with Dotmatics in order to use Vortex to its full potential as well as offer suggestions for its on-going development.’

‘We are delighted to welcome University of Leeds to the very active Vortex users community’ said Dr Mike Hartshorn, Dotmatics CSO, adding ‘we are pleased to see how rapidly leading academic organisations are adopting Vortex. The ability to bring together data from disparate sources such as enterprise databases, sdf files and excel files has never been easier. Vortex transforms the way data is converted into knowledge.’

Adam Nelson is Professor of Chemical Biology, University of Leeds


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