Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Informatics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Bruker Sets New Standards in Preclinical Imaging Software with ParaVision 6

Published: Thursday, September 19, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, September 19, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Higher productivity, increased performance and easy access to MRI for translational and pharmaceutical research.

At the 2013 World Molecular Imaging Congress (WMIC, www.wmicmeeting.org), Bruker has introduced its ParaVision® 6 software, setting new standards in preclinical MRI software that delivers significantly enhanced productivity for both, routine users and accomplished experts.

A redefined workflow introduces optimized, application-oriented experimental protocols, an intuitive, interactive 3D scan planning viewport, and automatic reporting.

Thanks to its DICOM-based data exchange module, ParaVision 6 seamlessly integrates with data from multimodal imaging studies employed in many preclinical research labs.

Delivering a quantum leap in ease of use, the redesigned ParaVision 6 workflow is designed with preclinical imaging in mind, featuring a newly developed user interface and easy parameter handling.

A guided imaging workflow produces consistent results and lowers the learning curve for biomedical researchers new to MRI.

A context-sensitive view reduces complexity by visualizing only parameters relevant to the operations at hand, ensuring intuitive and focused operation.

ParaVision 6 includes an extensive set of routine and advanced imaging sequences, supports seamless integration of parallel transmission techniques and incorporates a unique, integrated field map-based shimming procedure.

Integrated, real-time optimization features enable dynamic adjustment of parameters during scanning, provide integration of navigator scans, and on-the-fly, automatically calculated Shinnar-LeRoux RF pulses for optimum slice profiles.

In addition, automatic hardware recognition improves the set-up and reliability of the MRI system.

“With its innovative workflow concept, ParaVision 6 opens the door for preclinical MRI technology into new labs in pharma and translational research, while at the same time significantly increasing the productivity of research MRI users who welcome automated execution routines,” stated Dr. Wulf I. Jung, President of Bruker’s Preclinical Imaging Division.

ParaVision 6 is designed to benefit all modern Bruker MRI platforms from AVANCE™ II to AVANCE III HD, as well as ICON™ benchtop MRI and MPI (magnetic particle imaging) systems.

AVANCE III HD systems in particular benefit from new power management features that display the state of the system and its components, in addition to providing push-button system start-up and shutdown.

The ParaVision 6 true 64-bit architecture and parallel multi-core acquisition and reconstruction deliver high-resolution 3D images up to virtually unlimited size.

Advanced users will welcome the fully integrated method development environment that enables them to redefine their own boundaries in imaging research.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Bruker and ImaBiotech Announces Collaboration
Bruker to distribute ImaBiotech's Quantinetix software for quantitative MALDI imaging.
Friday, June 21, 2013
Bruker and SCiLS GmbH Announce an Exclusive Partnership for SCiLS Lab Software for MALDI Imaging
SCiLS Lab is the software developed by SCiLS GmbH which allows the user-friendly statistical analysis of large MALDI imaging datasets
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Scientific News
How to Become a Follicular T Helper Cell
Uncovering the signals that govern the fate of T helper cells is a big step toward improved vaccine design.
Sorting Through Cellular Statistics
Aaron Dinner, professor in chemistry, and his graduate student Herman Gudjonson are trying to read the manual of life, DNA, as part of the Dinner group’s research into bioinformatics—the application of statistics to biological research.
Paving the way to Better Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis
Aïcha BenTaieb will present her invention for automated identification of ovarian cancer’s many subtypes at an international conference this fall.
New Tool Uses 'Drug Spillover' to Match Cancer Patients with Treatments
Researchers have developed a new tool that improves the ability to match drugs to disease: the Kinase Addiction Ranker (KAR) predicts what genetics are truly driving the cancer in any population of cells and chooses the best "kinase inhibitor" to silence these dangerous genetic causes of disease.
Computer Model Could Explain how Simple Molecules Took First Step Toward Life
Two Brookhaven researchers developed theoretical model to explain the origins of self-replicating molecules.
The Mystery of the Instant Noodle Chromosomes
Researchers from the Lomonosov Moscow State University evaluated the benefits of placing the DNA on the principle of spaghetti.
Web App Helps Researchers Explore Cancer Genetics
Brown University computer scientists have developed a new interactive tool to help researchers and clinicians explore the genetic underpinnings of cancer.
An Innovative Algorithm to Decipher How Drugs Work Inside the Body
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have developed a computer algorithm that is helping scientists see how drugs produce pharmacological effects inside the body.
How do Networks Shape the Spread of Disease and Gossip?
A team of mathematicians from Oxford University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Rutgers University used a set of mathematical rules to encode how a contagion spreads, and then studied the outcomes of these rules.
AncestryDNA and Calico to Research the Genetics of Human Lifespan
Collaboration will analyze family history and genetics to facilitate development of cutting-edge therapeutics.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!