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PROTEOME WIDE PLASMA PROFILING USING ANTIBODY SUSPENSION BEAD ARRAYS
Maja Neiman, Ulrika Igel, Burcu Ayoglu, Kimi Drobin, Mathias Uhlén, Peter Nilsson and Jochen M. Schwenk

A newly developed antibody suspension bead array assay allows for a systematic and high-throughput plasma profiling. This microtiter based assay uses antibody-coupled beads for a multiplexed analysis of minute amounts of directly labelled samples. The key requirement of a?nity reagents towards all human proteins is met by the Human Protein Atlas project.

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Evaluation of microfluidic digital PCR for the detection of cancer biomarkers
Rebecca Sanders, Claire Bushell, Carole Foy, Daniel J. Scott

dPCR is achieved by sample partitioning prior to PCR amplification such that each reaction chamber contains one copy or less of target DNA. This dilution becomes the limiting factor and an accurate target molecule count is achievable. This study evaluates dPCR’s quantitative capabilities and investigates parameters influencing copy number quantification, using the Fluidigm Biomark instrument. Biomark technology combines dPCR theory with a microfluidics platform.

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Identification of differentially expressed transcripts associated to apomixis in B r a c h ia r ia using cDNA microarrays
Eduardo Gorrón 1 , 2, Diana Bernal 1, Silvia Restrepo & Joe Tohme

Apomixis is a trait which allows flowering plants to produce seeds by asexual ways. Molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon are poorly understood. We used cDNA microrrays coupled to substractive libraries to find genes related to apomixis in Brachiaria. Genes related to meiosis and cell division, and some putative transcription factors, were overexpressed in sexual plants. It may indicate that apomixis could be caused by downregulation of these genes.

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Design of an innovative microfluidic system to study chemotactic transmembranal migration of leukocytes
Elena Bianchi (a)(b)(c), Elwin Vrouwe (b) , Laganà Katia (a) , Margherita Cioffi (a), Marko Blom (b), Bob Lansdorp (b), Gabriele Dubini (a)

Aim of this project is to develop a versatile and highthroughput microdevice, to be employed in studies of leukocytic chemotaxis, shear stress dependent.

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Perfecting Bacterial Tumor Treatment using Microfluidic Bioreactors
Bhushan J. Toley, Brett M. Babin, Colin L. Walsh, Neil S. Forbes

Engineered bacteria provide a great opportunity to overcome the limitations of current cancer chemotherapeutics. We have developed microfluidic continuous flow-through devices as in-vitro models of tumor tissue and used them to quantify therapeutic efficacies of bacterial strains.

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A PDMS Sample Pre-treatment Device for the Optimization of Electrokinetic Manipulations of Serum
Tim Abram, Dr. David Clague

A PDMS “sample pretreatment” device has been fabricated in order to selectively tune key biological sample parameters which will optimize the sample for subsequent electrokinetic manipulations. We have shown that a raw sample can be homogeneously combined with specific buffers in a DC pulse micromixer in under 1.5 seconds.

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A novel dynamic biochip platform for real-time detection and quantification of proteins
M. Rendl, T. Brandstetter, J. Rühe

A proof of principle of a protein biochip platform permitting analysis of multiple clinically relevant proteins is presented.

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HIV POC testing by ssDNA coupled with NALF
Natasha Gous, Lesley E. Scott, Alexio Capovilla, Natela Rekhviasvili, Wendy Stevens

A isothermal amplification termed Reverse Transcription Loop Dependant Amplification (RT-LDA) was developed with an affordable nucleic acid lateral flow detection (NALF) system, as one component of a potential POC HIV-1 RNA assay for subtypeC. RT-LDA makes use of a primer design that efficiently converts viral RNA into ssDNA amplicons, in 1 hour at 53ºC. Due to the single stranded nature of the product, the amplicon could be detected using NALF.

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Microfluidic assembly of magnetic gel particles
C. H. Chen, A. R. Abate, D. Lee, E. M. Terentjev and D. A. Weitz

Monodisperse spherical magnetic gel particles containing asymmetric infrastructure were fabricated by a new microfluidics-based technique using double-emulsion droplet as templates. Double emulsions with functional cores and hydrogel shells were generated by the flow-focusing drop makers with special wettability patterning. Particles were made with a consistently anisotropic internal structure, which leads to their uniform anisotropy to perform the highly rotational controls by applying the magn

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Showing Results 61 - 70 of 141
Scientific News
Single-Cell, 42-plexed Protein Analysis Achieved with a New Microchip Technology
A novel microdevice capable of detecting 42 unique immune effector proteins has been developed.
Lab-on-a-Chip to Study Single Cells
Scientists at EPFL have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technique to analyze single cells from entire population. The new method, which uses beads and microfluidics can change the way we study mixed populations of cells, such as those of tumors.
Mini Synthetic Organism Instead Of Test Animals
Using a compact multi-organ chip, and those of three separate microcircuits, researchers can study the regeneration of certain kidney cells.
Rapid Test Kit Detects Dengue Antibodies from Saliva
IBN’s MedTech innovation simplifies diagnosis of infectious diseases.
UBC Engineers Develop Biochem Point-of-Care Lab for Smartphones
UBC Okanagan takes lab on a chip technology to a new inexpensive level.
New Way To Model Sickle Cell Behavior
Microfluidic device allows researchers to predict behavior of patients’ blood cells.
Watching How Cells Interact
New device allows scientists to glimpse communication between immune cells.
Extracting Tumor Cells From Blood
UCLA scientists use ‘NanoVelcro’ and temperature control to extract tumor cells from blood.
Sweeping Cells Apart For Use In Medical Research
Scientists have developed a new method to separate cells, which could lead to more efficient medical research.
How Bacteria Control Their Size
By monitoring thousands of individual bacteria scientists discovered how they maintain their size from generation to generation.
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