Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Lab-on-a-Chip & Microfluidics
Scientific Community
 
Join | Sign in
Home>Videos>This Video
  Videos

Return

Mapping Chemical Gradients in Living Tissue in Space and Time Using Microfluidics
SelectBio

Chemical gradients drive many processes in biology, ranging from nerve signal transduction to ovulation. At present, microscopy is the primary tool used to understand these gradients. Microscopy has provided many important breakthroughs in our understanding of the fundamental biology, but is limited due to the need to incorporate fluorescent molecules into biological systems. As a result, there is a need to develop tools that can measure chemical gradient formation in biological systems that do not require fluorescent modification of the targets in question, can be multiplexed to measure more than one molecule and is compatible with a variety of biological sample types, including in vitro cell cultures and ex vivo tissue slices. Work from our group on the development of microfluidic tools to measure chemical gradients in living tissue will be presented. Two separate systems are under development. The first is a microfluidic system designed to analyze metabolite and protein expression from tissue. The sampling system can resolve up to 19 different ports and can be interface with either electrochemical or fluorescence-based detection methods. Using these two detection methods, we are capable of analyzing the release of either small molecule metabolites or proteins and peptides using immunoassays. The second system uses a high-density electrode array to image release of electrochemically active metabolites like nitric oxide from live tissue slices. Electrochemical characterization of this system combined with a microfluidic system for gradient generation will be shown.

Request more information
Company product page


Access to this article and other content is for registered users.

Join the Technology Networks Community

  • Access to the latest scientific news, products and research through Technology Networks
  • Upload and share your posters on ePosters
  • View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
  • A library of 3,000+ scientific videos on LabTube


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you already have an account with Technology Networks, please use your existing login details. If you do not yet have an account please join here.

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Artificial Pancreas Controls Diabetes
Scientists are reporting the development of an implantable “artificial pancreas” that continuously measures a person’s blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed.
Major Step for Implantable Drug-Delivery Device
MIT spinout signs deal to commercialize microchips that release therapeutics inside the body.
Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections for Diabetes
A joint effort between diabetes doctors and biomedical engineers could revolutionize how people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels in check.
The Secrets of Secretion
Researchers have hacked nature's blueprints to create a new technology that could have broad-reaching impact on drug delivery systems and self-healing and anti-fouling materials.
New Tool on Horizon for Surgeons Treating Cancer Patients
Surgeons could know while their patients are still on the operating table if a tissue is cancerous, according to researchers.
Heartbeat on a Chip Could Improve Pharmaceutical Tests
A gravity-powered chip that can mimic a human heartbeat outside the body could advance pharmaceutical testing and open new possibilities in cell culture because it can mimic fundamental physical rhythms.
Unravelling the Mysteries of Carbonic Acid
Researchers have shown how gaseous carbon dioxide molecules are solvated by water to initiate the proton transfer chemistry that produces carbonic acid and bicarbonate.
Injectable Device Delivers Nano-View of the Brain
A team of researchers has developed a method of fabricating nanoscale electronic scaffolds that can be injected via syringe.
Gecko-Inspired Adhesives for Microfluidics
Scientists from Canada report an affordable manufacturing advance in microfluidics with a dry adhesive system that demonstrates strong, self-healing and reversible bonding.
How to Cut a Vortex Into Slices
Researchers have found a way of improving the rate and efficiency of microfluidic processes used in chemical research.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters