Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Mass Spectrometry
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Xceleron and JCL Bioassay Announce Partnership in Early Clinical Investigations

Published: Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Bookmark and Share
New offering will expand access to powerful analytical platforms.

The new partnership will offer drug developers access to the broadest range of sensitive and robust analytical platforms in early clinical development across Asia, Europe and N. America.

Phase 0 and enriched Phase 1 studies have been used successfully in recent years to investigate a range of developmental endpoints including drug presence at the tissue or cells of interest, absolute bioavailability and human metabolism. Investigations of this type conducted early in drug development allow confident critical decision-making that offers a very cost-effective alternative when compared to later stages of clinical development.

The partnership between Xceleron and JCL Bioassay will provide access to clinical design expertise and the most appropriate analytical platform for the purpose of early clinical investigation. Xceleron and JCL Bioassay have between them developed over 100 analytical methods for Phase 0 and enriched Phase 1 investigations and both companies have recently built, equipped and staffed laboratories specifically for the purpose of ultra-low level analyses under GLP and GCP conditions.

“This partnership emphasizes the critical role of contemporary analytical platforms in driving down the cost of drug development. Whether in Phase 0 or enriched Phase I, we can confidently provide critical PK and PD information before Phase II” said Dr Michael Butler, CEO of Xceleron.

“With 27 years’ experience in providing services for bioassay work coupled with-state-of-the-art analytical instruments, our researchers are well positioned to conduct ultrasensitive bioanalyses. This has led to the continuous growth of our company as a leader in the bioanalytical field and enables our customers to make rapid and precise decisions on their drug development programs. The partnership with Xceleron further expands the geographic and technological scope of the services we can provide to our customers and promotes the use of these cutting-edge analytical platforms to detect low level analytes in early drug development” said Jenny Lin, Vice President of Operations and CSO of JCL Bioassay USA, Inc.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Xceleron Announces Key Board and Executive Appointments
Increasing demand from big pharma for greater R&D productivity.
Thursday, July 21, 2011
Xceleron Expands US Operations
Xceleron announces a major milestone in the development of its US business with the signing of a lease on a multimillion dollar facility in Germantown, Maryland.
Monday, July 23, 2007
Xceleron Announces Expansion of US Operation
US Xceleron will invest up to $7.5m on the purchase of a new accelerator mass spectrometer, new laboratories in Maryland and additional personnel.
Wednesday, September 06, 2006
Xceleron Receives the Award for International Achievement at Yorkshire Bioscience Awards
Xceleron was recognized for its recent achievements overseas following the establishment of its subsidiary in the US.
Thursday, July 06, 2006
Xceleron Leads EU Microdose AMS Partnership Programme
The programme aims to certify AMS technologies as appropriate methodologies for measurements required by microdosing studies.
Thursday, January 12, 2006
Scientific News
Newly Identified Biochemical Pathway Could Be Target for Insulin Control
Researchers at Duke Medicine and the University of Alberta are reporting the identification of a new biochemical pathway to control insulin secretion from islet beta cells in the pancreas, establishing a potential target for insulin control.
Dirty,Crusty Meals Fit for (Long-Dormant) Microbes
Researchers apply the latest analytical techniques to further our understanding of desert biocrusts.
CSI -- On The Metabolite's Trail
Bioinformaticians at the University of Jena make the most efficient search engine for molecular structures available online.
First Complete Structural Study Of A Pegylated Protein
Significant data obtained at NUI Galway reports first crystal structure of a protein modified with a single PEG chain.
Potential Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Isolated
Researchers from North Carolina State University utilized a highly sensitive mass spectrometry analysis to identify and measure difficult-to-detect N-glycan biomarkers associated with ovarian cancers in stages I – IV.
Waters’ Centers of Innovation Program Honors Ohio State University Laboratory
Wysocki-led facility recognized for proteomics, disease research and mass spectrometry excellence.
Protein Aggregation After Heat Shock Is An Organized, Reversible Response
New study finds protein aggregation after heat exposure is a reversible cellular process, not unrecoverable damage from misfolding.
World’s Largest Protein Interaction Map Created
A multinational team of scientists sifted through cells of vastly different organisms – from amoebae to worms to mice to humans – to reveal how proteins fit together to build different cells and bodies.
Evidence of Ancient Life Discovered Deep Below the Seafloor
Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports a team of scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Virginia Tech, and the University of Bremen.
Structural Discoveries Could Aid in Better Drug Design
Scientists have uncovered the structural details of how some proteins interact to turn two different signals into a single integrated output.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos